Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Gynecology | Nursing | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

C-Section Linked to Increased Risk of Childhood Obesity

Last Updated: May 28, 2012.

 

At age 3, children delivered by C-section have double the odds of obesity, higher BMI z-score

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Infants delivered by cesarean section have two-fold higher odds of childhood obesity, even after adjusting for variables like maternal body mass index and birth weight, according to a study published online May 23 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

MONDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Infants delivered by cesarean section have two-fold higher odds of childhood obesity, even after adjusting for variables like maternal body mass index (BMI) and birth weight, according to a study published online May 23 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

To investigate whether delivery by cesarean section is a risk factor for childhood obesity, Susanna Y. Huh, M.D., M.P.H., from Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues conducted a prospective prebirth cohort study, enrolling women during early pregnancy, between 1999 and 2002. A total of 1,255 children were followed after birth, and body composition was assessed at 3 years of age.

The researchers found that 22.6 percent of children in the cohort were delivered by cesarean section. Of these children, 15.7 percent were obese at age 3 years compared with 7.5 percent of children born vaginally. After adjustment for variables, including maternal prepregnancy BMI and birth weight, birth by cesarean section correlated with increased likelihood of obesity at the age of 3 years (odds ratio, 2.10), higher mean BMI z-score (0.20 units), and an elevated sum of triceps plus subscapular skinfold thicknesses (0.94 mm).

"Infants delivered by cesarean section may be at increased risk of childhood obesity," the authors write. "Further studies are needed to confirm our findings and to explore mechanisms underlying this association."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Digestive Disease Week, May 19-22, 2012 Next: Video Games Positively Impact Variety of Health Outcomes

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.