Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

May 2012 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: June 01, 2012.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for May 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Phlebotomy Benefits Patients With Metabolic Syndrome

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with metabolic syndrome, phlebotomy correlates with lower systolic blood pressure and improvements in cardiovascular risk markers and glycemic control, with the changes associated with a reduction in ferritin, according to research published online May 30 in BMC Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Cardiovascular Risk Counseling Improves Statin Adherence

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients taking statins for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), extended care with nurse-led cardiovascular risk-factor counseling improves statin adherence and reduces anxiety, with improvements seen in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol for primary prevention patients, according to a study published online May 24 in The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Link Between Obesity and Lower-Extremity Lymphedema Explored

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Lower-extremity lymphedema may be due to extreme obesity, as there appears to be a body mass index (BMI) threshold above which lymphatic flow becomes impaired, according to a letter to the editor published in the May 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text

Mobile Technology Helps Improve Lifestyle Coaching

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Coaching supported by mobile technology can help adults improve their lifestyle, most significantly through increasing their intake of fruits and vegetables and decreasing sedentary leisure time, according to a study published in the May 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

AHA Recommends More Safeguards for Genetic Testing

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- While genetics show promise for improving health, more safeguards are needed to protect patients and allow scientific and clinical research to continue, according to recommendations issued by the American Heart Association and published online May 29 in Circulation.

Full Text

Upping Dietary Calcium Buys No Big Cardiovascular Benefit

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing dietary calcium intake might not offer significant cardiovascular benefits, but intake through calcium supplements might raise myocardial infarction (MI) risk, according to a study published online May 23 in Heart.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

U.S. Stroke Prevalence Little Changed in Recent Years

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of stroke in the United States has changed little over the past seven years, and disparities by race/ethnicity, education level, and geographic location still persist, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

Full Text

Low Vitamin D Intake Tied to Risk of Thromboembolic Stroke

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- In Japanese-American men, low dietary vitamin D intake is associated with an increased risk of all stroke and thromboembolic stroke during a 34-year follow-up period, according to a study published online May 24 in Stroke.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

One-Fifth of Healthy Middle-Aged Men Have Low-Grade Murmur

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-fifth of healthy middle-aged men have a low-grade systolic heart murmur that confers a nearly five-fold higher risk of future aortic valve replacement (AVR), according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Heart Failure Stem Cells Induced to Cardiomyocytes

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) derived from patients with heart failure can be induced to differentiate into cardiomyocytes (CMs), which then can integrate with host cardiac tissue, according to an experimental study published online May 22 in the European Heart Journal.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diabetes-Linked Cardio, All-Cause Mortality Decreasing

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- From 1997 to 2006, there was a significant decrease in the cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality rates for U.S. men and women with diabetes, according to research published in the June issue of Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text

Treatment With rt-PA Within Six Hours of Stroke Beneficial

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute ischemic stroke, treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) within six hours is associated with improved outcomes, according to two studies published online May 23 in The Lancet to coincide with presentation at the European Stroke Conference, held from May 22 to 25 in Lisbon, Portugal.

Abstract - Sandercock
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Wardlaw
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
More Information

Aspirin Effective in Preventing Thromboembolism Recurrence

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism who have completed oral anticoagulant treatment, aspirin effectively prevents recurrence, with no apparent increase in the risk of major bleeding, according to a study published in the May 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Genetic Testing Doesn't Up Post-Test Health Care Use

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Receiving genetic susceptibility testing is associated with an increase in physician visits before testing, but does not impact subsequent health care utilization, according to a study published online May 17 in Genetics in Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Characteristics of STEMI Reperfusion Systems Identified

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Successful ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) reperfusion systems share common characteristics, and these characteristics can be used to set standards for coordinated care, according to research published online May 22 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text

Hunter-Gatherer Lifestyle Tied to Low Atherosclerosis Risk

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Traditional hunter-gatherers have a lower risk of atherosclerosis, lower age-related increases in blood pressure, and reduced prevalence of hypertension, according to two studies published online May 21 in Hypertension.

Abstract - Lemogoum
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)
Abstract - Gurven
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

CPAP Use May Reduce Risk of Hypertension in Apnea Patients

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) without daytime sleepiness, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) does not significantly affect the incidence of hypertension or cardiovascular events; however, regular use of CPAP may reduce the increased risk of incident hypertension seen among patients with OSA, according to two studies published in the May 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Barbé
Full Text
Abstract - Marin
Full Text
Editorial

Post-Stroke Inpatient Statins Improve Discharge Outcomes

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Statin use during hospitalization for ischemic stroke significantly improves the likelihood of being discharged to home or institution, according to a study published in the May 22 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

QRS Duration Independently Tied to Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged QRS duration is associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD), according to a study published online May 21 in Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Cardiac Disease Risk Factors Prevalent Among U.S. Teens

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- From 1999 to 2008 the prevalence of several cardiovascular disease risk factors remained stable among U.S. adolescents, but the burden of risk factors is still considerable, according to a study published online May 21 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Palpitations Predict Future Atrial Fibrillation

FRIDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Palpitations, hypertension, and body mass index (BMI) are predictive of future atrial fibrillation (AF) in both men and women, according to a study published online May 15 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text

Short-Term Smoke Exposure Impairs Endothelial Function

FRIDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- Short-term exposure to low levels of secondhand smoke (SHS) results in a concentration-dependent decrease in endothelial function, according to a study published in the May 22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Generic Versions of Plavix Approved

THURSDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- The first generic versions of Plavix (clopidogrel bisulfate) have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

this drug

Retinal Vessel Diameter Linked to Heart Disease, Hypertension

THURSDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Baseline retinal vessel diameter is an independent predictor of incident hypertension, lower extremity arterial disease (LEAD), and any cardiovascular disease (CVD) at six years in African-American patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text

Causality Link Between HDL Cholesterol, MI Challenged

THURSDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Genetic mechanisms that are associated with high plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol do not reduce the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), adding question to causality of link, according to a study published online May 17 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Statins Benefit Those at Low Risk for Vascular Events

THURSDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- Reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol with statins is associated with a decrease in major vascular events, even for individuals with a five-year risk of less than 10 percent, according to research published online May 17 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Azithromycin Tied to Increased Risk of Cardiovascular Mortality

WEDNESDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Azithromycin treatment is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, according to a study published in the May 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Repeated Revascularization Doesn't Aid High-Risk Patients

WEDNESDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- For asymptomatic patients who are identified as high-risk by exercise echocardiography (ExE) after coronary revascularization, repeated revascularization is not associated with improved outcomes, according to a study published online May 14 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Full Text
Editorial

Increased Sudden Cardiac Death Rate Among HIV Patients

WEDNESDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with HIV/AIDS have a significantly increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD), according to a study published in the May 22 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Diagonal Ear Lobe Crease Tied to Coronary Artery Disease

WEDNESDAY, May 16 (HealthDay News) -- Diagonal ear lobe crease (DELC) is independently and significantly associated with the prevalence, extent, and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD), according to a study published in the May 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Air Pollution Linked to Cardiovascular Disease Markers

TUESDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Changes in air pollution levels during the Beijing Olympics were associated with changes in biomarkers linked to cardiovascular disease in healthy young people, according to a study published in the May 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on global health.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Peptide Level Ups Diagnosis of Heart Failure in Primary Care

TUESDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- For patients presenting with dyspnea, the additional measurement of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels increases the certainty of diagnosis of heart failure and accelerates initiation of appropriate treatment, but does not reduce medical costs, according to a study published online May 2 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lack of Post-MI Discharge Advice Hinders Sexual Activity

TUESDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Less than half of patients who suffer an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) receive instruction regarding resuming sexual activity on hospital discharge, with those who do not receive instruction more likely to report loss of sexual activity, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Being Fit Lowers HTN Risk in Those With Parental History

MONDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Having a moderate or high level of fitness can attenuate the increased risk of developing hypertension due to parental history, according to a study published online May 14 in Hypertension.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patients on Gilenya for MS May Require Extended Monitoring

MONDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Based on the report of a patient who died after taking one dose of the multiple sclerosis (MS) drug Gilenya (fingolimod) and on clinical trial data, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is recommending extended monitoring for certain patients taking this drug, according to a May 14 Drug Safety Communication issued by the agency.

More Information

Beta Blocker Use Is Not Linked to Reduced Colon Cancer Risk

MONDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- The use of beta blockers is not associated with a reduced risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), according to a study published online May 14 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Thrombus Aspiration in Primary PCI Has No Effect on Outcomes

MONDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- The use of manual or mechanical thrombus aspiration (TA) in adjunct to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) does not affect the two-year incidence of major adverse cardiac events in patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to a study published in the May 1 issue of Catheterization & Cardiovascular Interventions.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Post-SES Implantation, Statins Prevent Late Revascularization

FRIDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who undergo sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) implantation, use of statin therapy is associated with a reduced risk of late target lesion revascularization (TLR), according to a study published in the May 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Team-Centered Multicondition Care Deemed Cost-Effective

THURSDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with depression and poorly controlled diabetes and/or coronary heart disease (CHD), a collaborative care intervention is cost-effective, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Long Auto Commutes Found to Be Hazardous to Health

WEDNESDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Commuting distance is negatively associated with physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), and positively associated with obesity and metabolic risk indicators, according to a study published online May 8 in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Full Text

Poor Health Status Indicators ID'd for Patients With ICDs

TUESDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shock status and Type D personality are indicators of post-implantation health status at one-year follow-up, according to a study published online May 8 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Older Women With A-Fib at Greater Stroke Risk Than Men

TUESDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of stroke following a recent diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF) in older patients is higher in women than men, regardless of warfarin use, according to a study published in the May 9 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Living Close to Major Roadway at Time of MI Ups Mortality

TUESDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- For survivors of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), residential proximity to a major roadway at the time of AMI is linked to an increased risk of 10-year mortality, according to a study published in the May 8 issue of Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text

Exercise Training Reduces Muscle Proteolysis in CHF

MONDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Increased expression of MuRF-1, a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, is associated with chronic heart failure, and exercise training reduces MuRF-1 levels, according to a study published online May 7 in Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text

CMS Policy Helping Hospitals to Prevent Targeted Infections

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals seem to be paying greater attention to preventing targeted health care-associated infections (HAIs) as a result of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) nonpayment policy, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

Abstract
Full Text

TAVI Is a Reasonable Option for High-Risk Elderly Patients

THURSDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- For high-risk elderly patients with aortic stenosis, transcatheter aortic-valve implantation (TAVI) is a reasonable option, according to a study published in the May 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Endotoxemia Influenced by Diet Type

THURSDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- A Western-style diet is associated with increased levels of endotoxin activity (endotoxemia), and a prudent-style diet (containing moderately greater amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin C, and vitamin E than the Western-style diet) is linked to reduced endotoxemia, according to a study published in the May issue of Gastroenterology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Recent Improvement in 3D ECHO Accuracy for LV Mass

THURSDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- In the past decade there has been an improvement in the accuracy of three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) for measurement of left ventricular (LV) mass, according to a meta-analysis published online April 30 in The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Warfarin, Aspirin Comparable in Patients With Heart Failure

WEDNESDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- For heart failure patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) who are in sinus rhythm, there is no significant overall difference in the primary outcome between treatment with warfarin and treatment with aspirin, according to a study published online May 2 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Causal Link ID'd Between BMI, Ischemic Heart Disease

WEDNESDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- The positive association between body mass index (BMI) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) is likely to be causal, according to a study published online May 1 in PLoS Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Pulse Oximetry IDs Critical Congenital Heart Defects

WEDNESDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Pulse oximetry has high specificity, moderate sensitivity, and low false-positive rates for detecting critical congenital heart defects in asymptomatic newborns, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published online May 2 in The Lancet.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Methodological Heterogeneity Seen in Clinical Trials

TUESDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical studies registered with ClinicalTrials.gov from 2007 and 2010 are predominately small, single-center trials and contain significant heterogeneity in methodology, according to a study published in the May 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospital Strategies Linked to Lower Mortality After Acute MI

TUESDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Five specific hospital performance strategies have been identified that result in lower 30-day risk-standardized mortality rates (RSMRs) for patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), according to a study published in the May 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Index Identifies Clot Risk in Outpatient Surgery Patients

TUESDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Using a weighted risk index, the highest-risk outpatient surgery patients have an almost 20-fold increase in risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) requiring therapy, according to a study published online April 13 in the Annals of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: May 2012 Briefing - Allergy Next: May 2012 Briefing - Dermatology

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.