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Category: Nursing | Monthly Briefing

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May 2012 Briefing - Nursing

Last Updated: June 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Nursing for May 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Slow-Growing Melanomas Lose Structure, Vary Color With Time

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- The diameter of most slow-growing melanomas (SGMs) changes very little over time, but the lesions can become more disorganized, less structured, and change or develop new colors, according to a study published in the June issue of the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Infants May Be Exposed to Phthalates From PVC Floors

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Soft polyvinyl chloride (PVC) flooring material in an infant's bedroom, the infant's body surface area, and the use of infant formula are associated with an infant's increased uptake of phthalates, which may be linked to several chronic childhood diseases, according to research published online May 7 in Indoor Air.

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Adjunct Zinc Cuts Antibiotic Treatment Failure for Infants

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- For infants aged 7 to 120 days with probable serious bacterial infection, zinc given as an adjunct to standard antibiotic treatment is associated with less treatment failure, according to a study published online May 31 in The Lancet.

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White Matter Integrity Linked to Intelligence in Elderly

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Differences in white matter integrity in the brain account for some of the variation in general intelligence in elderly individuals, with their effect mediated by information-processing speed, according to a study published online May 22 in Molecular Psychiatry.

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BMI Thresholds for Gestational Diabetes Differ by Race

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- There is considerable racial/ethnic variation in the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) by body mass index (BMI), according to a study published online May 22 in Diabetes Care.

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Patient Goals for Presenting Internet Research to Docs Vary

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- When cancer patients approach their doctors with Internet research regarding their disease, their goals for the conversation affect how they perceive their provider's responses (attributions), according to a study published online May 17 in the Journal of Applied Communication Research.

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Radiation Ups Event-Free, Not Overall Survival in Ped Hodgkin's

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- For children with Hodgkin's lymphoma who respond to chemotherapy, treatment with low-dose involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT) improves event-free survival (EFS), but has no significant impact on overall survival (OS), in long-term follow-up, according to a study published online May 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Neural Link Between Resiliency and Alcohol, Drug Use Identified

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- For young adults, the coupling strength between the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and median cingulate cortex may be involved in the association between resiliency and alcohol/drug use, according to a study published online May 15 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Intensive Glucose Control Helps Surrogate Renal End Points

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive glucose therapy significantly reduces microalbuminuria and macroalbuminuria in adults with type 2 diabetes, but does not improve clinical renal outcomes, according to a study published in the May 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Cardiovascular Risk Counseling Improves Statin Adherence

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients taking statins for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), extended care with nurse-led cardiovascular risk-factor counseling improves statin adherence and reduces anxiety, with improvements seen in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol for primary prevention patients, according to a study published online May 24 in The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Repeat CT Scan Urged for Head Trauma Patients on Warfarin

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Minor head trauma patients taking warfarin should have a repeat computed tomography (CT) scan prior to discharge to detect delayed hemorrhage, particularly in those with an initial international normalized ratio (INR) higher than 3, according to research published in the June issue of the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Hypothermia of Some Benefit to Neonates With Encephalopathy

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- For infants with neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, undergoing whole-body hypothermia results in lower mortality rates as well as a nonsignificant reduction in the combined end point of death or an IQ score of less than 70 at age 6 to 7 years, compared with usual care, according to a study published in the May 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Oral, Injected Methotrexate Have Similar Efficacy in JIA

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Oral and injected methotrexate are equally effective for treating children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, according to a study published online May 30 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Link Between Obesity and Lower-Extremity Lymphedema Explored

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Lower-extremity lymphedema may be due to extreme obesity, as there appears to be a body mass index (BMI) threshold above which lymphatic flow becomes impaired, according to a letter to the editor published in the May 31 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Online Adderall May Contain Wrong Active Ingredients

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Consumers purchasing the drug Adderall online may be buying a counterfeit version that could be ineffective, unsafe, and potentially harmful, according to a safety alert issued May 30 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Working Night Shift May Increase Breast Cancer Risk

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- There may be an increased risk of developing breast cancer among women who work night shifts, according to a study published online May 29 in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

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Protein Elevated in Stroke Patients With Microbleeds

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a marker of vascular permeability, are significantly higher in stroke patients with cerebral microbleeds, according to a study published online May 28 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Risk Models Only Slightly Up Prediction of Complex Diseases

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Risk models that take gene-gene and gene-environment interactions into account only slightly improve the prediction of risk for three complex diseases, according to a study published online May 24 in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

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Acne Medication Isotretinoin Increases Risk of Eye Disorders

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- The acne medicine isotretinoin may be linked to a nearly two-fold increased risk of ocular adverse effects in users, according to a study published online April 16 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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Post-Transplant, eGFR Impacts Cardio Risk Independently

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- In stable kidney transplant recipients, kidney function, as determined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), is independently associated with cardiovascular (CVD) events and death, according to research published online May 17 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

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Glucose Levels at Admission Predict Death in Pneumonia

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with community-acquired pneumonia without preexisting diabetes, serum glucose levels at admission are predictive of death at 28 and 90 days, according to a study published online May 29 in BMJ.

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Pathologic Response Prediction of Survival Aided by Tumor Type

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Pathologic complete response (pCR) is more highly predictive of recurrence-free survival (RFS) when specific breast cancer tumor type is factored in, according to a study published online May 29 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Mobile Technology Helps Improve Lifestyle Coaching

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Coaching supported by mobile technology can help adults improve their lifestyle, most significantly through increasing their intake of fruits and vegetables and decreasing sedentary leisure time, according to a study published in the May 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Diabetes Linked to Lung Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal women with diabetes are at a significantly higher risk of developing lung cancer, particularly if they require insulin therapy, according to research published online May 22 in Diabetes Care.

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AHA Recommends More Safeguards for Genetic Testing

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- While genetics show promise for improving health, more safeguards are needed to protect patients and allow scientific and clinical research to continue, according to recommendations issued by the American Heart Association and published online May 29 in Circulation.

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NSAID Use Linked to Reduced Risk of Skin Cancer

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including nonselective NSAIDs and older cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, are associated with a decreased risk of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and malignant melanoma (MM), particularly among long-term and high-intensity NSAID users, according to a study published online May 29 in Cancer.

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Lower Limb Muscle Limitations Hamper Walking in Diabetes

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, diabetes correlates with slower walking speed, and diabetes-linked reductions in muscle strength and worse muscle quality contribute to these walking limitations, according to a study published online May 17 in Diabetes Care.

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School-Based Exercise Program Improves Bone Mass, Size

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- A long-term, school-based exercise program for children is associated with increased bone mass and size, with no increase in the fracture risk, according to a study published online May 28 in Pediatrics.

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Solvent Exposure Tied to Lower Cognition Among Less Educated

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Occupational exposure to chemical solvents affects the cognitive abilities of less-educated workers, but not more-educated workers, with a dose-response relationship between lifetime exposure and the risk of poor cognition, according to a study published in the May 29 issue of Neurology.

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AAP Cautions Against Diagnosis of Sensory Processing Disorder

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians should avoid the use of sensory processing disorder as an independent diagnosis and should integrate sensory-based therapy as one part of a comprehensive treatment plan, according to a policy statement issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online May 28 in Pediatrics.

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Evidence Updated for Impact of Menopausal Hormone Therapy

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- An updated review clarifies the impact of menopausal hormone therapy on the risk of chronic conditions, according to research published online May 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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KATNAL1 Essential for Fertility in Male Mice

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Mice who have a loss-of-function mutation in KATNAL1, needed for the maturation of sperm, are infertile, which could have implications for treating male infertility and for the development of non-hormonal male contraceptives, according to a study published online May 24 in PLoS Genetics.

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Fever During Pregnancy Linked to Autism in Offspring

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal influenza during pregnancy is not associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or developmental delay (DD), but the odds of ASD and DD are increased for children whose mothers had fever during pregnancy, according to a study published online May 5 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

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Evidence for Prevention of HIV Transmission Reviewed

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence-based pharmacologic strategies for prevention of HIV transmission include postexposure prophylaxis, pre-exposure prophylaxis, and early initiation of treatment, according to a review published online May 28 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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PUFA Formula Supplementation Doesn't Up Infant Cognition

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Supplementation of infant formula with long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) is not associated with improved cognition; and infants fed with milk- or soy protein-based formula have similar cognitive development scores, which are slightly lower than those of breastfed infants, according to two studies published online May 28 in Pediatrics.

Abstract - Qawasmi
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Social Networks Play a Role in Childhood Obesity

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Afterschool friendships play a critical role in setting physical activity patterns in children as young as 5 to 12 years, according to a study published online May 28 in Pediatrics.

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Video Games Positively Impact Variety of Health Outcomes

MONDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Although additional rigorous clinical trials are warranted, the literature suggests that video games can be useful in improving a variety of health outcomes, particularly those in the areas of psychological and physical therapy, according to research published online in the June issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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C-Section Linked to Increased Risk of Childhood Obesity

MONDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Infants delivered by cesarean section have two-fold higher odds of childhood obesity, even after adjusting for variables like maternal body mass index (BMI) and birth weight, according to a study published online May 23 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Research Offers Insight Into Link Between Metabolism, Epilepsy

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- In mice, modifications to the BCL-2-associated agonist of cell death (BAD) protein -- a protein that reduces glucose metabolism -- induce an increase in metabolically responsive adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, and resistance to seizures, according to a study published in the May 24 issue of Neuron.

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Transvaginal Mesh Op Restores Pelvic Organ Prolapse at Price

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Transvaginal mesh (TVM) procedures are effective for anatomical restoration of pelvic organ prolapse (POP), but patients report a worsening of sexual function following surgery, according to a study published online May 21 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Probability of Long-Term Glioblastoma Survival Assessed

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Although the overall mortality rate of glioblastoma is high, compared with patients newly diagnosed with glioblastoma, those who survive two years or more after diagnosis have a favorable conditional probability of future survival, according to a study published online May 8 in Cancer.

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Family History of Alzheimer's Affects Functional Connectivity

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitively normal individuals with a family history of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) may display lower resting state functional connectivity in the default mode network (DMN) of the brain, and this effect is detectable even in those who do not carry the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele, according to a study published online May 9 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Individual Variation in Antiviral Response Present at Birth

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Congenital variations in innate immunity, which are detectable at birth, might predict an infant's susceptibility to acute respiratory tract illness during the first year of life, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Interneuron Transplant Treats Neuropathic Pain in Mice

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Transplanting embryonic GABAergic interneurons into the spinal cords of mice is highly effective for treating neuropathic pain but not inflammatory pain, according to an experimental study published in the May 24 issue of Neuron.

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Childhood Obesity Linked to Idiopathic Intracranial HTN

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Overweight and obese children are at higher risk of developing idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), particularly non-Hispanic white adolescent girls, according to a study published online May 24 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Cognitive, Sound-Based Combo Therapy Reduces Tinnitus

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- A multidisciplinary approach to treating tinnitus that combines cognitive behavior therapy with sound-based tinnitus retraining therapy is significantly more effective than currently available treatments for reducing symptoms in otherwise healthy subjects, according to a study published in the May 26 issue of The Lancet.

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Upping Dietary Calcium Buys No Big Cardiovascular Benefit

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing dietary calcium intake might not offer significant cardiovascular benefits, but intake through calcium supplements might raise myocardial infarction (MI) risk, according to a study published online May 23 in Heart.

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Magnesium Not Recommended After Subarachnoid Bleed

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, intravenous magnesium sulfate is no better than placebo for reduction of poor outcome, according to a study published online May 25 in The Lancet to coincide with presentation at the European Stroke Conference, held from May 22 to 25 in Lisbon, Portugal.

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Pancreatectomy OK Without Downstaging From Therapy

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Pancreatectomy improves median survival in pancreatic cancer patients even when presurgical neoadjuvant therapy does not lead to radiographic downstaging of tumors, according to a study published online May 17 in Cancer.

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Selenium and/or Vitamin E Do Not Prevent Bladder Cancer

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Neither selenium nor vitamin E alone or used in combination appears to prevent bladder cancer in men, according to a study published in the June issue of The Journal of Urology.

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Neck Strength, Cervical Spine Mobility Don't Predict Pain

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Neither isometric neck muscle strength nor passive mobility of the cervical spine, two physical capacity parameters found to be associated with neck pain in other studies, predicts later neck pain in pain-free working-age women, according to a study published in the May 20 issue of Spine.

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Common Therapies for Basal Cell Carcinoma Offer Similar Survival

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC), treatment with imiquimod or photodynamic therapy (PDT) results in similar long-term tumor-free survival, according to a review published online May 21 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Peritonitis Ups Odds of Mortality in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients who die while on peritoneal dialysis, peritonitis is associated with mortality, with the highest odds for peritonitis in the 30 days before death, according to a study published online May 24 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Low Vitamin D Intake Tied to Risk of Thromboembolic Stroke

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- In Japanese-American men, low dietary vitamin D intake is associated with an increased risk of all stroke and thromboembolic stroke during a 34-year follow-up period, according to a study published online May 24 in Stroke.

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U.S. Stroke Prevalence Little Changed in Recent Years

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of stroke in the United States has changed little over the past seven years, and disparities by race/ethnicity, education level, and geographic location still persist, according to a study published in the May 25 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Vemurafenib, Dabrafenib Linked to Cutaneous Side Effects

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- The selective small molecule inhibitors of BRAF, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, are associated with diverse cutaneous side effects, including both malignant and benign growths, when used to treat patients with melanoma with the BRAF V600E mutation, according to research published online May 21 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Emily Y. Chu, M.D., Ph.D., of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and colleagues evaluated the cutaneous adverse effects of vemurafenib and dabrafenib in 13 patients being treated for metastatic melanoma and one patient being treated for metastatic thyroid cancer.

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Low-Glucose Suspend Function in Insulin Pumps Deemed Safe

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Sensor-augmented pump therapy with a low-glucose suspend (LGS) function appears to be safe for patients with type 1 diabetes, according to a study published online May 14 in Diabetes Care.

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Oncologists Grief at Patient Loss Affects Treatment

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Oncologists grieve over dead and dying patients, and this grief can affect both their treatment of other patients and their personal lives, according to a research letter published online May 21 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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School-Aged Children With ASD Usually Identified At Age 5

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- School-aged children with special health care needs (CSHCN) who have an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are usually identified at age 5, and the majority use one or more services and/or at least one psychotropic medication to meet their developmental needs, according to a May data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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One-Fifth of Healthy Middle-Aged Men Have Low-Grade Murmur

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- More than one-fifth of healthy middle-aged men have a low-grade systolic heart murmur that confers a nearly five-fold higher risk of future aortic valve replacement (AVR), according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Extending Care Helps Maintain Long-Term Weight Loss

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Extended patient care has a moderate effect on long-term maintenance of weight loss, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published in the June issue of Obesity Reviews.

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Brentuximab Vedotin Effective in Large-Cell Lymphoma

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of patients with relapsed or refractory systemic anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) treated with the CD30-directed antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin achieve a complete remission, according to the results of a phase II study published online May 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Barbara Pro, M.D., of the Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, and colleagues conducted a prospective study involving 58 patients with systemic ALCL and recurrent disease after at least one previous therapy. Participants received an outpatient infusion of brentuximab vedotin 1.8 mg/kg every three weeks. Overall objective response rate was the primary study end point.

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IUDs, Implants Most Effective for Preventing Pregnancy

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Long-acting reversible methods of contraception such as intrauterine devices (IUDs) or implants are more effective for preventing unintended pregnancy than oral contraceptive pills, transdermal patches, or contraceptive vaginal rings, regardless of the user's age, according to a study published in the May 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Diabetes-Linked Cardio, All-Cause Mortality Decreasing

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- From 1997 to 2006, there was a significant decrease in the cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality rates for U.S. men and women with diabetes, according to research published in the June issue of Diabetes Care.

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Treatment With rt-PA Within Six Hours of Stroke Beneficial

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute ischemic stroke, treatment with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) within six hours is associated with improved outcomes, according to two studies published online May 23 in The Lancet to coincide with presentation at the European Stroke Conference, held from May 22 to 25 in Lisbon, Portugal.

Abstract - Sandercock
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Aspirin Effective in Preventing Thromboembolism Recurrence

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism who have completed oral anticoagulant treatment, aspirin effectively prevents recurrence, with no apparent increase in the risk of major bleeding, according to a study published in the May 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New Estimates Up Dementia Rates in Mid-Income Countries

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Use of 10/66 dementia diagnosis criteria (10/66) results in an increase in the estimated incidence of dementia in middle-income countries, according to a study published online May 23 in The Lancet.

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Imaging Predicts Breast Cancer Response to Chemotherapy

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- For women with breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery, measurements taken by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) predict clinical response better than clinical assessment, according to a study published in the June issue of Radiology.

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Regorafenib Active in Metastatic GI Stromal Tumors

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Regorafenib, an inhibitor of multiple cancer-associated kinases, is active in patients with metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) who have failed to respond to imatinib and sunitinib, according to a study published online May 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Genetic Testing Doesn't Up Post-Test Health Care Use

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Receiving genetic susceptibility testing is associated with an increase in physician visits before testing, but does not impact subsequent health care utilization, according to a study published online May 17 in Genetics in Medicine.

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Patients Can Minimize Injection Pain by Looking Away

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- The intensity of pain and unpleasantness associated with a needle prick is affected not only by previous experiences with needle pricks but also by information given prior to an injection, according to research published in the May issue of Pain.

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Maternal Weight Ups Infant Size More Than Glucose Intolerance

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- For women without gestational diabetes, excess maternal weight gain during pregnancy and body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy are greater predictors of large-for-gestational-age infants than mild glucose intolerance and lipid levels, according to a study published online May 22 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Characteristics of STEMI Reperfusion Systems Identified

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Successful ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) reperfusion systems share common characteristics, and these characteristics can be used to set standards for coordinated care, according to research published online May 22 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Hunter-Gatherer Lifestyle Tied to Low Atherosclerosis Risk

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Traditional hunter-gatherers have a lower risk of atherosclerosis, lower age-related increases in blood pressure, and reduced prevalence of hypertension, according to two studies published online May 21 in Hypertension.

Abstract - Lemogoum
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Abstract - Gurven
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For Older Women, Saturated Fats Linked to Worse Cognition

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- For older women, higher saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake correlates with worse global cognition and verbal memory trajectories, while higher intake of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) correlates with improved trajectories, according to a study published online May 17 in the Annals of Neurology.

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CPAP Use May Reduce Risk of Hypertension in Apnea Patients

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) without daytime sleepiness, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) does not significantly affect the incidence of hypertension or cardiovascular events; however, regular use of CPAP may reduce the increased risk of incident hypertension seen among patients with OSA, according to two studies published in the May 23/30 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Barbé
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Abstract - Marin
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Hair Loss Pathology Identified in Pityriasis Versicolor Lesions

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with pityriasis versicolor (PV) lesions may experience hair thinning and/or loss within the lesion, according to a study published online May 10 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Post-Stroke Inpatient Statins Improve Discharge Outcomes

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Statin use during hospitalization for ischemic stroke significantly improves the likelihood of being discharged to home or institution, according to a study published in the May 22 issue of Neurology.

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QRS Duration Independently Tied to Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Prolonged QRS duration is associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD), according to a study published online May 21 in Circulation.

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Chemoradiotherapy Improves Survival for Elderly With NSCLC

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- For elderly patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), treatment with radiotherapy plus carboplatin improves overall survival versus radiotherapy alone, according to a study published May 22 in The Lancet Oncology.

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Vigorous Physical Activity Tied to Reduced Psoriasis Risk

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Vigorous physical activity is associated with a reduced risk of psoriasis in women, according to a study published online May 21 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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Weight Loss Reduces Potential Breast Cancer Biomarkers

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- Postmenopausal weight loss through diet and the combination of diet and exercise is associated with a significant reduction in serum estrogens and free testosterone, according to a study published online May 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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U.S. Task Force Recommends Against PSA-Based Screening

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against the use of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening for men in the general U.S. population, according to new guidelines published online May 21 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Dabrafenib Safe, Active Against Some Metastatic Melanomas

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Dabrafenib, the mutant BRAF-selective inhibitor of BRAF kinase, is safe for treating solid tumors and shows antitumor activity against Val600-mutant BRAF melanomas and other solid tumors, including melanomas that have metastasized to the brain, according to a study published in the May 19 issue of The Lancet.

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Higher Pain Tolerance for Athletes Than Active Controls

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes seem to have significantly higher pain tolerance than normally-active people, according to research published in the June issue of Pain.

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Phylogenomic Analysis Reveals Origin, Spread of MRSA Clone

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Phylogenomic analysis has revealed details about the emergence and transmission of a major methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clone, EMRSA-16, according to research published online May 14 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Folic Acid Enrichment May Reduce Specific Pediatric Cancers

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Following mandatory folic acid fortification of enriched grain products in the United States in 1996 to 1998, there has been a decrease in the incidence of some childhood cancers, including Wilms tumor (WT) and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs), according to a study published online May 21 in Pediatrics.

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'Risky Music Behaviors' Linked to Other Risk Behaviors in Youth

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Listening to loud music is highly associated with traditional health-risk behaviors in youth, including binge drinking and unprotected sex in frequent visitors to live music venues and cannabis use in MP3-player listeners, according to a study published online May 21 in Pediatrics.

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Parents of Children With Epilepsy Have Suboptimal Sleep

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of children with epilepsy often share a room or cosleep with their child, with both parents and child having suboptimal sleep and greater fatigue, according to a study published online May 17 in Epilepsia.

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Cardiac Disease Risk Factors Prevalent Among U.S. Teens

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- From 1999 to 2008 the prevalence of several cardiovascular disease risk factors remained stable among U.S. adolescents, but the burden of risk factors is still considerable, according to a study published online May 21 in Pediatrics.

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White Matter of Abstinent Alcoholics Recovers Over Time

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), the microstructural changes seen in the genu and body of the corpus callosum in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients are found to improve after one year of abstinence, according to research published online May 2 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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