Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Orthopedics | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

May 2012 Briefing - Orthopedics

Last Updated: June 01, 2012.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Orthopedics for May 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

More Bone Grafts, Screws Tied to Less Spinal Reconstruction Stress

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing the number of bone grafts and screws used for fusing multiple cervical spine segments yields a more stable construct that decreases the stresses at the graft end plate and bone-screw interfaces, according to a study published online May 10 in The Spine Journal.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

School-Based Exercise Program Improves Bone Mass, Size

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- A long-term, school-based exercise program for children is associated with increased bone mass and size, with no increase in the fracture risk, according to a study published online May 28 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Neck Strength, Cervical Spine Mobility Don't Predict Pain

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Neither isometric neck muscle strength nor passive mobility of the cervical spine, two physical capacity parameters found to be associated with neck pain in other studies, predicts later neck pain in pain-free working-age women, according to a study published in the May 20 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Posterior Repair Successful for Cervical Pseudarthrosis

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Posterior cervical lateral mass screw fixation and fusion can be successfully used to manage patients with symptomatic cervical pseudarthrosis that develops after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Aspirin Effective in Preventing Thromboembolism Recurrence

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism who have completed oral anticoagulant treatment, aspirin effectively prevents recurrence, with no apparent increase in the risk of major bleeding, according to a study published in the May 24 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Higher Pain Tolerance for Athletes Than Active Controls

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes seem to have significantly higher pain tolerance than normally-active people, according to research published in the June issue of Pain.

Abstract
Full Text

Instrumented Spinal Fusion Method Impacts Infection Rate

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- For patients who undergo instrumented spinal fusion, the rates of infection are higher among those who receive posterior lumbar interbody fusion compared with those who receive posterior or posterolateral fusion, according to a study published online May 10 in the Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increase in Physical Activity in Men Optimizes Peak Bone Mass

FRIDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- For young men, increasing physical activity over a five-year period is associated with improvements in bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD), according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

Abstract
Full Text

Inadequate Pain Meds in ER for Patients With Long-Bone Fx

FRIDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- The majority of patients with long-bone fractures receive inadequate pain medication in the emergency department, and disparities in management exist, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Gender, High DAS28-P Index Predictive of Pain in Early RA

FRIDAY, May 18 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), female gender and having a high proportion of disease activity score (DAS28) attributable to patient-reported components (joint tenderness and visual analog score) (DAS28-P) at baseline are predictive of less improvement in pain at one year, according to a study published online May 3 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bisphosphonates Cut Skeletal Morbidity in Multiple Myeloma

THURSDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with multiple myeloma, bisphosphonate treatment is associated with reduced pathological vertebral fractures, skeletal related events (SREs), and pain, but bisphosphonates do not appear to improve overall survival (OS), with the exception of zoledronate, which has been found to be superior to placebo and etidronate for improving OS, according to a review and meta-analysis published online May 16 in the The Cochrane Library.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Predictors of Length of Hospital Stay After Spine Surgery ID'd

THURSDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- A variety of pre-, intra-, and postoperative factors contribute to increased length of stay (LOS) for patients who undergo level 1 minimally invasive (MIS) transforaminal interbody fusions (TLIF) spine surgery, according to a study published online May 8 in Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Neurally Controlled Arm Lets Tetraplegics Reach, Grasp

THURSDAY, May 17 (HealthDay News) -- For tetraplegic individuals, use of a neural interface system is a feasible approach to direct robotic arm actions to reach and grasp, according to a letter published online May 16 in Nature.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Low Back Pain Improves Soon After Treatment, but Still Lingers

TUESDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute or persistent low back pain, pain and disability improve in the first six weeks of treatment, but low-to-moderate pain and disability tend to persist at one year, according to a review published online May 14 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Lowest Fused Vertebral Level Linked to Motion in Scoliosis

THURSDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- For postoperative patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), preservation of vertebral motion segments allows for greater distribution of functional motion, according to a study published in the May 1 issue of Spine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lack of Sleep Not Necessarily Detrimental to Surgical Skills

WEDNESDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep-deprived medical students are able to perform and learn surgical skills, although they have an increased total subjective mental workload, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospitals Lack Hand Surgeons for Emergencies

MONDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- There is a shortage of hand specialists to provide emergency coverage in the state of Tennessee, according to research published in the May issue of the Annals of Plastic Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

CMS Policy Helping Hospitals to Prevent Targeted Infections

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals seem to be paying greater attention to preventing targeted health care-associated infections (HAIs) as a result of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) nonpayment policy, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

Abstract
Full Text

Training Helps OR Nurses Manage Disruptive Physician Behavior

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Communication skills training may help nurses manage disruptive physician behavior, according to a study published in the May issue of the AORN Journal.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Perioperative Interruptions Lead to Miscommunication

THURSDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- The number of miscommunications that occur during surgery is inversely associated with the length of time a team has worked together, and positively associated with the number of interruptions during surgery, according to a study published in the May issue of the AORN Journal.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Body Fat Linked to Reduced Fracture Risk for Women

WEDNESDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Higher body fat mass is associated with a reduced risk of fracture among women, but not men, according to a study published in the May issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Methodological Heterogeneity Seen in Clinical Trials

TUESDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical studies registered with ClinicalTrials.gov from 2007 and 2010 are predominately small, single-center trials and contain significant heterogeneity in methodology, according to a study published in the May 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

A Third of Adults With Arthritis Have Anxiety, Depression

TUESDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- One-third of U.S. adults with physician-diagnosed arthritis report having anxiety or depression, with anxiety more prevalent than depression, according to a study published online May 1 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Obesity, Increased Incidence of Rheumatoid Arthritis Linked

TUESDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity is linked with the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and seems to have contributed to the recent increase in incidence of the condition, according to a study published online April 18 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Index Identifies Clot Risk in Outpatient Surgery Patients

TUESDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Using a weighted risk index, the highest-risk outpatient surgery patients have an almost 20-fold increase in risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) requiring therapy, according to a study published online April 13 in the Annals of Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: May 2012 Briefing - Ophthalmology Next: May 2012 Briefing - Pediatrics

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.