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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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May 2012 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: June 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for May 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Neural Link Between Resiliency and Alcohol, Drug Use Identified

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- For young adults, the coupling strength between the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and median cingulate cortex may be involved in the association between resiliency and alcohol/drug use, according to a study published online May 15 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Cardiovascular Risk Counseling Improves Statin Adherence

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- For patients taking statins for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), extended care with nurse-led cardiovascular risk-factor counseling improves statin adherence and reduces anxiety, with improvements seen in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol for primary prevention patients, according to a study published online May 24 in The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Genetic Personality Traits May Play Role in Longevity

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Centenarians often have a positive outlook on life, are less likely to be neurotic, and are more likely to be conscientious, suggesting that genetically-based aspects of personality play a role in longevity, according to a study published online May 21 in Aging.

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White Matter Integrity Linked to Intelligence in Elderly

THURSDAY, May 31 (HealthDay News) -- Differences in white matter integrity in the brain account for some of the variation in general intelligence in elderly individuals, with their effect mediated by information-processing speed, according to a study published online May 22 in Molecular Psychiatry.

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Online Adderall May Contain Wrong Active Ingredients

WEDNESDAY, May 30 (HealthDay News) -- Consumers purchasing the drug Adderall online may be buying a counterfeit version that could be ineffective, unsafe, and potentially harmful, according to a safety alert issued May 30 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Fever During Pregnancy Linked to Autism in Offspring

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal influenza during pregnancy is not associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or developmental delay (DD), but the odds of ASD and DD are increased for children whose mothers had fever during pregnancy, according to a study published online May 5 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders.

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AAP Cautions Against Diagnosis of Sensory Processing Disorder

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatricians should avoid the use of sensory processing disorder as an independent diagnosis and should integrate sensory-based therapy as one part of a comprehensive treatment plan, according to a policy statement issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online May 28 in Pediatrics.

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Solvent Exposure Tied to Lower Cognition Among Less Educated

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Occupational exposure to chemical solvents affects the cognitive abilities of less-educated workers, but not more-educated workers, with a dose-response relationship between lifetime exposure and the risk of poor cognition, according to a study published in the May 29 issue of Neurology.

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Video Games Positively Impact Variety of Health Outcomes

MONDAY, May 28 (HealthDay News) -- Although additional rigorous clinical trials are warranted, the literature suggests that video games can be useful in improving a variety of health outcomes, particularly those in the areas of psychological and physical therapy, according to research published online in the June issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Family History of Alzheimer's Affects Functional Connectivity

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitively normal individuals with a family history of late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) may display lower resting state functional connectivity in the default mode network (DMN) of the brain, and this effect is detectable even in those who do not carry the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele, according to a study published online May 9 in the Annals of Neurology.

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School-Aged Children With ASD Usually Identified At Age 5

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- School-aged children with special health care needs (CSHCN) who have an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are usually identified at age 5, and the majority use one or more services and/or at least one psychotropic medication to meet their developmental needs, according to a May data brief issued by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Oncologists Grief at Patient Loss Affects Treatment

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Oncologists grieve over dead and dying patients, and this grief can affect both their treatment of other patients and their personal lives, according to a research letter published online May 21 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Exposure Therapy Alters Neural Response to Feared Stimuli

THURSDAY, May 24 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure therapy is linked with reduced phobogenic image-induced activity in a network of brain regions, and the reduced responsiveness persists for six months, according to a study published online May 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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New Estimates Up Dementia Rates in Mid-Income Countries

WEDNESDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- Use of 10/66 dementia diagnosis criteria (10/66) results in an increase in the estimated incidence of dementia in middle-income countries, according to a study published online May 23 in The Lancet.

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For Older Women, Saturated Fats Linked to Worse Cognition

TUESDAY, May 22 (HealthDay News) -- For older women, higher saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake correlates with worse global cognition and verbal memory trajectories, while higher intake of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) correlates with improved trajectories, according to a study published online May 17 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Higher Pain Tolerance for Athletes Than Active Controls

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes seem to have significantly higher pain tolerance than normally-active people, according to research published in the June issue of Pain.

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White Matter of Abstinent Alcoholics Recovers Over Time

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), the microstructural changes seen in the genu and body of the corpus callosum in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients are found to improve after one year of abstinence, according to research published online May 2 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Trail Making Test Performance Predicts Post-Stroke Mortality

TUESDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- Poor executive performance, as measured with the Trail Making Test (TMT)-A and -B, can identify elderly men who are at higher risk of death after a first-ever stroke, according to a study published online May 9 in BMJ Open.

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U.S. Lifetime Prevalence of Sleep Walking ~30 Percent

TUESDAY, May 15 (HealthDay News) -- The lifetime prevalence of nocturnal wandering with abnormal state of consciousness (NW) is approximately 30 percent in the U.S. general population, according to a study published in the May 15 issue of Neurology.

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Youth With ASD Have Poor Postsecondary Outcomes

MONDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are at high risk for not participating in postsecondary education or employment, particularly in the first two years after high school, according to a study published online May 14 in Pediatrics.

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Psychiatric Patients Wait Average of 11.5 Hours in ER

MONDAY, May 14 (HealthDay News) -- Average emergency department wait times for adult patients with psychiatric emergencies is 11.5 hours, and can be even longer for those who are older, uninsured, or intoxicated, according to research published online May 4 in the Annals of Emergency Medicine.

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Brain Stimulation Improves Brain Function in Alzheimer's

FRIDAY, May 11 (HealthDay News) -- Deep brain stimulation can improve brain connectivity and function in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease, and having a greater purpose in life reduces the effect of Alzheimer's pathology on cognitive function, according to one study published online May 7 in the Archives of Neurology and another study published in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Abstract - Smith
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Abstract - Boyle
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Nonmedical Prescription Pain Medication Use Peaks at Age 16

THURSDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Use of prescription pain relievers to get high or for other nonmedical purposes (extramedical use) peaks around age 16 years, according to a study published online May 7 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Team-Centered Multicondition Care Deemed Cost-Effective

THURSDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- For adults with depression and poorly controlled diabetes and/or coronary heart disease (CHD), a collaborative care intervention is cost-effective, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Mid- and Late-Life Depression Tied to Dementia Risk

THURSDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with depressive symptoms either in midlife or late in life are at increased risk of developing dementia, according to a study published in the May issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Glycemic Variability Affects Mood and Quality of Life

THURSDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Glycemic variability appears to be associated with lower quality of life and negative moods in women with type 2 diabetes, according to a study published in the March 30 issue of Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics.

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Health-Related QoL Evaluated for Children With Brain Tumors

WEDNESDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- In children and adolescents with brain tumors treated with proton radiation, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) scores are affected by both disease type and treatment, with assessments made by the patients correlating well with those of their parents, according to a study published online May 7 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Editorial

Poor Health Status Indicators ID'd for Patients With ICDs

TUESDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) shock status and Type D personality are indicators of post-implantation health status at one-year follow-up, according to a study published online May 8 in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

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Self-Disclosure Linked to Activation of Reward in Brain

TUESDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Self-disclosure is associated with increased activation in regions of the brain linked with reward, according to research published online May 7 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Screening for Intimate Partner Violence Proves Beneficial

MONDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Screening instruments can be used in the health care setting to accurately identify women who are experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV), with minimal adverse effects, according to a review published online May 7 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Computer Use + Exercise Lower Mild Cognitive Impairment Risk

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- The combination of engaging in moderate exercise and using a computer significantly reduces the likelihood of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) among the elderly, according to a study published in the May issue of the Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

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Variation in Dopamine Function Impacts Cost/Benefit Decisions

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Variation in human dopamine function is associated with cost/benefit preferences, according to a study published in the May 2 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.

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Problem Behavior Up Among Children Born Post-Term

THURSDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Children born post-term have an increased risk of problem behavior and are more likely to have clinical attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in early childhood, according to a study published online May 2 in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

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Antipsychotic Maintenance Rx Aids Schizophrenia Patients

THURSDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Maintenance therapy with antipsychotic drugs is associated with a reduction in the relapse rate in schizophrenia, but benefits must be weighed against risks of adverse side effects, according to a review published online May 3 in The Lancet.

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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Peers Influence Both Pro- and Anti-Alcohol Behavior

THURSDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents are very adaptable to changing their alcohol norms based on those of their peers, especially peers of high-status, who may successfully either encourage or discourage alcohol use, according to a study published online April 17 in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.

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Generally No Link Between Prenatal Smoking and Autism

THURSDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- Generally there is no association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and risk of the child developing autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), although there may be a link between smoking and development of high-functioning autism, according to a study published online April 25 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Abstract
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Omega-3 Intake Linked With Reduced Plasma β-Amyloid 42

WEDNESDAY, May 2 (HealthDay News) -- Higher intake of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) is correlated with lower plasma levels of β-amyloid (Aβ)42, according to a study published online May 2 in Neurology.

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A Third of Adults With Arthritis Have Anxiety, Depression

TUESDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- One-third of U.S. adults with physician-diagnosed arthritis report having anxiety or depression, with anxiety more prevalent than depression, according to a study published online May 1 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Methodological Heterogeneity Seen in Clinical Trials

TUESDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical studies registered with ClinicalTrials.gov from 2007 and 2010 are predominately small, single-center trials and contain significant heterogeneity in methodology, according to a study published in the May 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Indirect Link ID'd Between Pain Catastrophizing, Severity

TUESDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Pain catastrophizing, in particular ruminating about pain, has an indirect effect on clinical pain severity and pain-related interference, through sleep disturbance, according to a study published online March 14 in Pain.

Abstract
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