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Category: Urology | Monthly Briefing

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May 2012 Briefing - Urology

Last Updated: June 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Urology for May 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

KATNAL1 Essential for Fertility in Male Mice

TUESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Mice who have a loss-of-function mutation in KATNAL1, needed for the maturation of sperm, are infertile, which could have implications for treating male infertility and for the development of non-hormonal male contraceptives, according to a study published online May 24 in PLoS Genetics.

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Transvaginal Mesh Op Restores Pelvic Organ Prolapse at Price

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Transvaginal mesh (TVM) procedures are effective for anatomical restoration of pelvic organ prolapse (POP), but patients report a worsening of sexual function following surgery, according to a study published online May 21 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Selenium and/or Vitamin E Do Not Prevent Bladder Cancer

FRIDAY, May 25 (HealthDay News) -- Neither selenium nor vitamin E alone or used in combination appears to prevent bladder cancer in men, according to a study published in the June issue of The Journal of Urology.

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U.S. Task Force Recommends Against PSA-Based Screening

MONDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against the use of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening for men in the general U.S. population, according to new guidelines published online May 21 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Lack of Sleep Not Necessarily Detrimental to Surgical Skills

WEDNESDAY, May 9 (HealthDay News) -- Sleep-deprived medical students are able to perform and learn surgical skills, although they have an increased total subjective mental workload, according to a study published in the January issue of the American Journal of Surgery.

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Sperm Travel in 'Channel Corners,' Not in Channel Center

TUESDAY, May 8 (HealthDay News) -- Sperm cells travel in the intersection of channel walls, not in central channels, and experience frequent collisions, according to a study published online May 7 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Resistance Patterns of Urinary E. coli Isolates Changing

MONDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- The antimicrobial resistance of urinary Escherichia coli (E. coli) isolates to ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) increased substantially from 2000 to 2010, according to a study published in the April issue of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

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Criteria for Surveillance of Small Renal Mass Examined

MONDAY, May 7 (HealthDay News) -- Active surveillance of patients with small renal masses is driven by a tumor size less than 3 cm, poor performance score (PS), and an endophytic lesion, among other patient, tumor, and surgeon characteristics, according to research published in the May issue of Urology.

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CMS Policy Helping Hospitals to Prevent Targeted Infections

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitals seem to be paying greater attention to preventing targeted health care-associated infections (HAIs) as a result of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) nonpayment policy, according to a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Complementary Medicine Not Tied to Prostate Cancer Outcome

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Although widely used, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) does not impact patient satisfaction with treatment or patient-reported outcomes after treatment for localized prostate cancer, according to a study published in the May issue of Urology.

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Training Helps OR Nurses Manage Disruptive Physician Behavior

FRIDAY, May 4 (HealthDay News) -- Communication skills training may help nurses manage disruptive physician behavior, according to a study published in the May issue of the AORN Journal.

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Perioperative Interruptions Lead to Miscommunication

THURSDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- The number of miscommunications that occur during surgery is inversely associated with the length of time a team has worked together, and positively associated with the number of interruptions during surgery, according to a study published in the May issue of the AORN Journal.

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Office Evaluation Comparable to Pre-Op Urodynamic Testing

THURSDAY, May 3 (HealthDay News) -- For women with uncomplicated stress incontinence, preoperative office evaluation alone is noninferior to urodynamic testing with respect to success of treatment at one year, according to a study published online May 2 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Methodological Heterogeneity Seen in Clinical Trials

TUESDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Clinical studies registered with ClinicalTrials.gov from 2007 and 2010 are predominately small, single-center trials and contain significant heterogeneity in methodology, according to a study published in the May 2 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Index Identifies Clot Risk in Outpatient Surgery Patients

TUESDAY, May 1 (HealthDay News) -- Using a weighted risk index, the highest-risk outpatient surgery patients have an almost 20-fold increase in risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) requiring therapy, according to a study published online April 13 in the Annals of Surgery.

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