Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Orthopedics | Rheumatology | Anesthesiology & Pain | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Disability in Juvenile Arthritis Affects Adult Employment

Last Updated: June 01, 2012.

 

Educational attainment impacts employment; influenced by functional disability, not JIA subtype

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Disability resulting from juvenile idiopathic arthritis can affect educational attainment and ultimately impact employment in adulthood, according to a study published online May 31 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

FRIDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Disability resulting from juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) can affect educational attainment and ultimately impact employment in adulthood, according to a study published online May 31 in Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Ajay Malviya, from Wansbeck General Hospital in Ashington, U.K., and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study involving 103 adults (median age, 24 years; median disease duration, 19 years) attending a JIA continuity clinic. Participants completed questionnaires relating to educational achievement and employment status. The Health Assessment Questionnaire was used to assess functional disability, and those who were employed answered the Work Instability Score.

The researchers found that patients who were in employment and those with oligoarticular JIA had significantly lower functional disability (P = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). JIA subtype did not influence educational achievement (P = 0.33), but educational achievement at General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) level had a significant and positive impact on the type of job achieved in later life. Educational achievement at GCSE level positively influenced job stability, whereas disability score negatively affected job stability.

"Educational attainment is key to successful employability and is influenced by functional disability rather than JIA subtype," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Spondylolisthesis Linked to Spinous Process Fractures Next: Acellular Dermal Matrix Safe, Useful in Breast Reconstruction

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.