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Acellular Dermal Matrix Safe, Useful in Breast Reconstruction

Last Updated: June 01, 2012.

 

Good outcomes; seroma complications higher with AlloDerm human matrix than porcine Strattice

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Acellular dermal matrices provide good outcomes for patients undergoing breast reconstruction following mastectomy, but the human AlloDerm matrix has a higher seroma rate than porcine Strattice matrix, according to a study published in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

FRIDAY, June 1 (HealthDay News) -- Acellular dermal matrices provide good outcomes for patients undergoing breast reconstruction following mastectomy, but the human AlloDerm matrix has a higher seroma rate than porcine Strattice matrix, according to a study published in the June issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Scot B. Glasberg, M.D., and David Light, M.D., from Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, reviewed patient records to compare the clinical course and postoperative outcomes associated with the use of AlloDerm or Strattice acellular dermal matrices. Histologic analyses were performed on biopsy specimens of the matrices.

AlloDerm was used in 126 reconstructions in 96 patients and Strattice was used in 144 reconstructions in 90 patients. The researchers found that total complications were significantly higher with AlloDerm (21.4 versus 6.3 percent). The higher rate of complications was driven by a significantly higher seroma rate in the AlloDerm group (12.7 versus 1.4 percent). Rates of other complications were similar between the groups. The capsular contracture rate (grade 1 or 2) was 2.4 and 2.8 percent with AlloDerm and Strattice, respectively, indicating a potential role in capsule formation. This was supported by histologic analyses, which showed a lack of synovia-like metaplasia seen at the interface between the acellular dermal matrix and tissue expander.

"Complications in this series were of low severity, which, together with consistent clinical outcomes seen in the authors' practice, justifies the cost associated with the use of acellular dermal matrices in breast reconstruction," the authors write.

One author disclosed financial ties to LifeCell Corporation, which provided editorial support for the study and manufactures the acellular dermal matrices.

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Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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