Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Nursing | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Early Rapid Growth Partly Mediates Genetic Obesity Risk

Last Updated: June 07, 2012.

 

Children at higher genetic risk have rapid early weight gain; reach adiposity rebound earlier

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Developmental phenotypes partially mediate the link between genetic predisposition and adult obesity, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

THURSDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Developmental phenotypes partially mediate the link between genetic predisposition and adult obesity, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Daniel W. Belsky, Ph.D., from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, and colleagues examined data from 1,037 participants of a prospective longitudinal study of a birth cohort. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to obesity phenotypes were identified in genome-wide association studies and made up the genetic risk score. At age 11 years, participants' family history was assessed from parent body mass index data. Obesity outcomes were measured from anthropometric assessments at birth and at 12 subsequent in-person interviews through 38 years of age.

The researchers found that individuals with higher genetic risk scores were more likely to be chronically obese in adulthood. Genetic risk was not correlated with birth weight; however, after birth, those at higher genetic risk gained weight more rapidly and reached adiposity rebound earlier and at a higher body mass index. Adult obesity was predicted by these developmental phenotypes, which mediated about half the genetic effect on adult obesity risk. The observed genetic associations with growth and obesity risk were independent of family history.

"Genetic variation linked with obesity risk operates, in part, through accelerating growth in the early childhood years after birth," the authors write. "Etiological research and prevention strategies should target early childhood to address the obesity epidemic."

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Elevated Antibody Component Tied to Worse General Survival Next: MRSA Colonization Up in Contacts of Staph-Infected Children

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.