Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Cardiology | Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Neurology | Nursing | Pulmonology | Conference News

Back to Journal Articles

SLEEP: Short Sleep Ups Stroke Risk in Normal-Weight

Last Updated: June 11, 2012.

 

Risk up for normal-weight adults with low risk of sleep-disordered breathing who sleep <6 hours

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
For normal-weight adults with a low risk of sleep-disordered breathing, habitually sleeping less than six hours per night is associated with an increased risk of stroke symptoms, according to a study presented at SLEEP 2012, the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, held from June 9 to 13 in Boston.

MONDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- For normal-weight adults with a low risk of sleep-disordered breathing, habitually sleeping less than six hours per night is associated with an increased risk of stroke symptoms, according to a study presented at SLEEP 2012, the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, held from June 9 to 13 in Boston.

To investigate whether sleep duration is predictive of self-reported stroke symptoms, Megan Ruiter, M.D., from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and colleagues conducted a cohort study involving 5,666 adults, aged 45 years and older, without history of stroke, transient ischemic attack, or high risk for sleep-disordered breathing. Participants reported their average sleep duration, and, at six-month intervals, self-reported stroke symptoms were collected.

In the unadjusted model, the researchers found that short sleep duration of less than six hours and long sleep duration of nine or more hours significantly predicted stroke symptoms, but after adjustment, the effect was attenuated. There was a significant interaction noted between sleep duration and body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.047); short sleep duration correlated with stroke symptoms for those with normal BMI (hazard ratio, 2.93), with no correlation seen for overweight or obese individuals. In a fully-adjusted model, a sleep duration of less than six hours correlated with increased incidence of stroke symptoms for those with normal BMI (hazard ratio, 4.54).

"In employed middle-aged to older adults, relatively free of major risk factors for stroke such as obesity and sleep-disordered breathing, short sleep duration may exact its own negative influence on stroke development," Ruiter said in a statement. "We speculate that short sleep duration is a precursor to other traditional stroke risk factors, and once these traditional stroke risk factors are present, then perhaps they become stronger risk factors than sleep duration alone."

Press Release
More Information

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: EULAR: Early Menopause Linked to Milder Form of RA Next: SLEEP: Sleep Deprivation Alters Neural Response to Food

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.