Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Neurology | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Walking Speed May Be Early Marker of Cognitive Impairment

Last Updated: June 11, 2012.

 

Walking speed and its variability may distinguish elderly with mild cognitive impairment

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
For elderly patients, walking speed and its variability may help distinguish individuals with mild cognitive impairment from those with normal cognition, according to a study published in the June 12 issue of Neurology.

MONDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- For elderly patients, walking speed and its variability may help distinguish individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from those with normal cognition, according to a study published in the June 12 issue of Neurology.

To investigate whether walking speed and its variability can distinguish those with MCI from those with intact cognition, Hiroko Dodge, Ph.D., from the Oregon Health & Science University in Portland, and colleagues assessed walking speed using passive infrared sensors in the homes of elderly participants from the Intelligent Systems for Assessing Aging Change cohort study. Participants included 54 with intact cognition, 31 with nonamnestic MCI, and eight patients with amnestic MCI at baseline. The weekly mean speed was analyzed with latent trajectory models, and walking speed variability (coefficient of variation [COV]) was assessed.

During a mean follow-up of 2.6 years, the researchers found that trajectory models identified three trajectories of mean weekly walking speed: fast, moderate, and slow. Participants with nonamnestic MCI were significantly more likely to be in the slow-speed group than the moderate- or fast-speed groups. Four distinct trajectories were identified in the COV. Participants with nonamnestic MCI were more likely to be in the lowest or highest baseline COV groups, rather than the relatively stable middle groups.

"Walking speed and its daily variability may be an early marker of the development of MCI," the authors write. "These and other real-time measures of function may offer novel ways of detecting transition phases leading to dementia."

The study was partly funded by the Intel Corporation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: ADA: Hypo-Hyperglycemia Minimizer System Feasible Next: Thiazolidinedione Use Linked to Diabetic Macular Edema

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.