Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Patterns of Unprofessional Behavior by Hospitalists ID’d

Last Updated: June 18, 2012.

 

Multicenter study identifies key factors underlying unprofessional behavior among hospitalists

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Hospitalist participation in unprofessional behavior is generally low, and is associated with job characteristics, age, and site, according to a systematic review published online May 16 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

MONDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalist participation in unprofessional behavior is generally low, and is associated with job characteristics, age, and site, according to a systematic review published online May 16 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

To quantify perceptions of, and participation in, unprofessional behaviors, Shalini T. Reddy, M.D., of the University of Chicago, and colleagues conducted an observational study of 77 hospitalists in three academic health centers.

The researchers found that participation in egregious behaviors was less than 5 percent. Having personal conversations in patient corridors, ordering "urgent" tests to expedite care, and making fun of other physicians were the most frequently reported behaviors. Seventy-six percent of the survey variance was explained by four factors: making fun of others, learning environment (e.g., texting during a conference), management of workload, and time pressure. Hospitalists with less clinical time were significantly more likely to make fun of other physicians. Workload management behaviors, such as celebrating a blocked-admission, were more frequently reported by younger hospitalists or those with administrative time. Time-pressure behaviors, such as signing out of work early, were more likely to be reported by hospitalists working the night shift. Learning environment and workload management behaviors varied according to site.

"Interventions to promote professionalism should take institutional culture into account and should focus on behaviors with the highest participation rates," a coauthor said in a statement. "Although this study found that unprofessional behavior was thankfully rare, such behavior is unacceptable in a professional hospital setting and needs to be addressed."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Sports-Related Kidney Injuries Rare in High School Athletes Next: Sleep Apnea Severity Linked to Glycated Hemoglobin Levels

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.