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American Diabetes Association, June 8-12, 2012

Last Updated: June 18, 2012.

 

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The American Diabetes Association's 72nd Scientific Sessions

The annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association was held from June 8 to 12 in Philadelphia and attracted approximately 13,000 participants from around the world, including clinicians, academicians, allied health professionals, and others interested in diabetes. The conference highlighted the latest advances in diabetes research and improving patient care, with presentations focusing on treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes.

In the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth study, Phil Zeitler, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of Colorado in Denver, and colleagues evaluated the efficacy and safety of type 2 diabetes medications used in children and adolescents. The investigators also identified children with faster diabetes progression and those who could effectively manage their diabetes based on their initial response to metformin.

"The five key results of the study include: 1) metformin monotherapy was not adequate for sustained diabetes control in half of adolescents in the study; 2) the addition of a second agent provided 23 percent more of adolescents with glycemic control; 3) intensive lifestyle intervention was not successful in prolonging glycemic control; 4) gender, race, and ethnicity played a role in glycemic control; and 5) one-half of the adolescents were able to get durable glycemic control," Zeitler said. "The implications of this study for the practicing clinician include consideration of early intervention of combination therapy with insulin and metformin; taking into account race, ethnicity, and gender in treatment decision; and identification of adolescents who can easily attain glycemic control."

Press Release

In another study, Til Stürmer, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health in Chapel Hill, and colleagues found that insulin glargine was not associated with an increased risk of cancer in patients with type 2 diabetes. The investigators evaluated 43,306 cancer-free patients starting treatment with insulin glargine and 9,147 cancer-free patients initiating treatment with neutral protamine Hagedorn.

"In conclusion, we found no evidence of an increased risk for cancer and we specifically found no increased risk for breast cancer in the small group that stayed on these drugs for more than 24 months," Stürmer said in a statement. "Our study adds to the important evidence about long-term outcomes of these antidiabetic treatments."

Press Release

In the Northern European Study of Insulin and Cancer, Peter Boyle, Ph.D., of the International Prevention Research Institute in Lyon, France, and colleagues evaluated 447,821 patients with diabetes over 3.1 years for those administered insulin glargine and 3.5 years for those given other insulins. The investigators evaluated overall cancer risk as well as risk for breast, lung, pancreas, colorectal, and prostate cancers, individually.

"There was no difference in risk between glargine and other insulins found in any of the pre-defined primary and secondary hypotheses of this study," Boyle said in a statement.

Press Release

ADA: Impact of Insulin Glargine on Cardio Outcomes Negligible

TUESDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- The use of insulin glargine to normalize fasting blood glucose levels is not associated with improvements in cardiovascular outcomes compared with standard care, according to a study published online June 11 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the American Diabetes Association's 72nd Scientific Sessions, held from June 8 to 12 in Philadelphia.

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ADA: Salsalate Doesn't Up Endothelial Function in T2DM

TUESDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), treatment with salsalate does not improve endothelial function as measured by flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent dilation (FMD), although it is associated with lower glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and markers of inflammation, according to a study presented at the American Diabetes Association's 72nd Scientific Sessions, held from June 8 to 12 in Philadelphia.

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ADA: Omega-3 Fatty Acids Don't Cut Cardiovascular Death

MONDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with dysglycemia and at high risk of cardiovascular events, supplementation with omega 3 (n-3) fatty acids does not reduce the rate of cardiovascular events, according to a study published online June 11 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the American Diabetes Association's 72nd Scientific Sessions, held from June 8 to 12 in Philadelphia.

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ADA: Hypo-Hyperglycemia Minimizer System Feasible

MONDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- The hypoglycemia-hyperglycemia minimizer (HHM) system, which includes a continuous, subcutaneous insulin infusion pump, continuous glucose monitor (CGM), and software, is able to predict changes in blood glucose and adjust accordingly, and manipulate insulin delivery compared to corresponding basal rates, according to two studies presented at the American Diabetes Association's 72nd Scientific Sessions, held from June 8 to 12 in Philadelphia.

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ADA: Reversion of Prediabetes to Normal Cuts Diabetes Risk

MONDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with prediabetes who achieve normal glucose regulation have a lower risk of developing diabetes, according to a study published online June 9 in The Lancet to coincide with presentation at the American Diabetes Association's 72nd Scientific Sessions, held from June 8 to 12 in Philadelphia.

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ADA: Type 2 Diabetes Rising Significantly in U.S. Youth

MONDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- From 2001 to 2009, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes increased 21 percent among youth in the United States, according to research presented at the American Diabetes Association's 72nd Scientific Sessions, held from June 8 to 12 in Philadelphia.

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Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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