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Associated Professional Sleep Societies, June 9-13, 2012

Last Updated: June 18, 2012.

 

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The Associated Professional Sleep Societies 26th Annual Meeting

The annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, SLEEP 2012, was held from June 9 to 13 in Boston and attracted approximately 5,000 participants from around the world, including clinicians, academicians, allied health professionals, and others interested in sleep disorders. The conference featured presentations focusing on the latest advances in sleep medicine and research as well as best clinical practices.

In one study, Andrea Goldstein, a graduate student at the Sleep and Neuroimaging Laboratory at the University of California Berkeley, and colleagues evaluated nonclinical participants and subjected them to a night of sleep deprivation -- 24 hours without any sleep. The investigators then tested participants' brain reactions to this negative event and found that sleep deprivation increased activity in the regions of the brain involved in emotional processing and anticipation.

"We found that sleep deprivation for a 24-hour period increases anticipation reactions in nonclinical participants without a diagnosis of anxiety disorder. We also found that participants who were not diagnosed with anxiety but more prone to having anxiety were more susceptible to this effect," Goldstein said.

According to Matthew Walker, Ph.D., director of the Sleep and Neuroimaging Laboratory and a contributing author, the medical community appears to understand that anxiety and sleep disruption go hand in hand but the relationship between these two remains unclear.

"This study shows that sleep deprivation in people without clinical anxiety can trigger an exaggerated emotional brain reaction that is similar to those with anxiety disorders," Walker said. "In addition, those people who were more anxious to begin with, and hence potentially more at risk for developing an anxiety disorder, suffered the greatest vulnerability to this sleep deprivation effect."

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In another study, Mahmood Siddique, D.O., of the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Brunswick, N.J., and colleagues found that the risk of sleep apnea was very high among individuals with diabetes. In addition, sleep apnea was associated with carbohydrate craving among diabetes patients.

"A key finding of this study was that diabetes patients had almost twice the risk of carbohydrate craving than those without diabetes. Compared to many existing studies, this study showed that the prevalence of sleep apnea among diabetes patients was quite high (82 percent)," Siddique said. "The management of patients with diabetes and or metabolic syndrome needs to take into account the risk of sleep apnea in order to ensure better outcomes. A greater awareness among physicians is needed, as sleep apnea is often undiagnosed by both primary care physicians and endocrinologists alike."

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James Spilsbury, Ph.D., of the Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, and colleagues found that specific aspects of a child's sleep were impacted by the severity and type of violent events in their lives, and this impact lasted over time.

"The first key result was that, over the three-month study period, children who were victimized (physically assaulted) during the violent event they witnessed had poorer sleep quantity (in terms of lower sleep duration) and quality (in terms of lower sleep efficiency, which is the time in bed that one is actually asleep) than the children who were not victimized by the event, and this effect did not change over the study period," Spilsbury said. "The second key result was that children who witnessed a homicide were somewhat more likely to have greater nightly variation in sleep duration over time. Such nightly irregularity in sleep patterns is thought to negatively affect children's health and functioning."

Spilsbury recommends that clinicians may help families be aware that witnessing violence can affect children in many ways, including their sleep behavior, and to explore with families how children are sleeping, determining whether getting a child help from a psychologist or other trained professional might be warranted.

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SLEEP: CPAP Ups Sexual Function for Men With Sleep Apnea

WEDNESDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- For men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy is associated with an improvement in sexual function and satisfaction, with more robust improvements seen for men with baseline erectile dysfunction (ED), according to a study presented at SLEEP 2012, the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, held from June 9 to 13 in Boston.

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SLEEP: Sleep-Disordered Breathing Affects Youth Behavior

TUESDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- Youth with persistent and/or current sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) have increased odds and greater rates of impairment on behavior and adaptive functioning scales, according to a study presented at SLEEP 2012, the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, held from June 9 to 13 in Boston.

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SLEEP: Positive Airway Pressure Eases Depression in Sleep Apnea

TUESDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), treatment with positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy is associated with an improvement in depressive symptoms, according to a study presented at SLEEP 2012, the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, held from June 9 to 13 in Boston.

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SLEEP: Short Sleep Ups Stroke Symptoms in Normal-Weight

MONDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- For normal-weight adults with a low risk of sleep-disordered breathing, habitually sleeping less than six hours per night is associated with an increased risk of stroke symptoms, according to a study presented at SLEEP 2012, the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, held from June 9 to 13 in Boston.

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SLEEP: Sleep Deprivation Alters Neural Response to Food

MONDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- After sleep restriction, unhealthy food activates reward centers in the brain; and sleep deprivation impairs brain activity in areas of the frontal lobe responsible for making complex choices, according to two studies presented at SLEEP 2012, the annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, held from June 9 to 13 in Boston.

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