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Category: Infections | Monthly Briefing

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June 2012 Briefing - Infectious Disease

Last Updated: July 02, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Infectious Disease for June 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Hep B Screening Urged Before TNF-Alpha Inhibitor Therapy

FRIDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- All patients with psoriasis should be screened for hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antibody prior to the initiation of tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitor therapy, according to research published online June 25 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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New Single Tablet for HIV Is Integrase Inhibitor Based

FRIDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- For treatment-naive patients with HIV-1 infection, the once-daily tablet with HIV integrase strand transfer inhibitor elvitegravir (EVG), co-formulated with the CYP3A4 inhibitor cobicistat (COBI), emtricitabine (FTC), and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), also known as EVG/COBI/FTC/TDF, is noninferior to a ritonavir-boosted (RTV) protease inhibitor regimen of atazanavir (ATV)/RTV+FTC/TDF, according to a phase 3 study published online June 29 in The Lancet.

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Supreme Court Upholds Health Care Reform Law

THURSDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Supreme Court voted June 28 to uphold the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), which has been the subject of debate and multiple lawsuits since its 2010 inception.

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Ringer's Acetate Better for Patients With Severe Sepsis

WEDNESDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Fluid resuscitation with hydroxyethyl starch (HES) 130/0.4 for patients with severe sepsis leads to an increased risk of death at day 90 and an increased likelihood of requiring renal-replacement therapy, compared with Ringer's acetate, according to a study published online June 27 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Bacterial Vaginosis Linked to Increased HIV-1 Transmission

WEDNESDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Bacterial vaginosis is associated with a three-fold higher risk of HIV-1 transmission from infected women to their uninfected male partners, according to a study published online June 26 in PLoS Medicine.

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Duplicate Payments by Federal Government Increasing

WEDNESDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- The federal government spends a substantial and increasing amount on individuals who are dually enrolled in separate managed care programs (the Veterans Affairs health care system [VA] and Medicare Advantage plan [MA]), according to a study published online June 26 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the Annual Research Meeting of AcademyHealth, held from June 24 to 26 in Orlando, Fla.

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Use of Electronic Records Tied to Fewer Malpractice Claims

TUESDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- Use of electronic health records (EHRs) is associated with fewer medical malpractice claims among physicians from multiple surgical and medical specialties, according to a research letter published online June 25 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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New Global Estimate Ups Number of H1N1-Linked Deaths

TUESDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- The estimated number of global respiratory and cardiovascular deaths associated with the 2009 pandemic influenza A H1N1 is higher than the number of laboratory-confirmed deaths, according to a modeling study published online June 26 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Early Vaccinations Not Linked to Celiac Disease in Sweden

MONDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Early vaccinations do not seem to influence the risk of celiac disease (CD) among infants, nor do changes in the vaccination program explain the CD epidemic, according to a Swedish study published online June 25 in Pediatrics.

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Low Bone Mass for Young Men on Antiretrovirals for HIV

FRIDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Young men recently diagnosed with HIV infection, treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART), have lower bone mass, according to a study published online May 9 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Pandemic Bird Flu Transmissible by Air in Ferrets

FRIDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Five mutations in a pandemic avian influenza virus can allow airborne transmission of the virus between ferrets, according to a study in the June 22 issue of Science.

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Half of Residents Report Working While Sick

THURSDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- About half of residents have worked while sick, with many reporting feeling obligated to colleagues and patients, according to a research letter published online June 18 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Periodontitis Linked to HPV-Positive Head, Neck Tumors

WEDNESDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) there is an increased risk of human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive tumors among those with a history of periodontitis, according to a study published online June 18 in the Archives of Otolaryngology -- Head & Neck Surgery.

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Hepatitis B Screening Before Chemo Deemed Cost-Effective

WEDNESDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- Universal hepatitis B virus (HBV) screening before chemotherapy for lymphoma reduces costs in most settings, according to a study published online June 18 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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More Parents Not Adhering to Vaccine Schedule

MONDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- The number of children consistently delaying vaccinations in Portland increased more than three-fold from 2006 to 2009, according to a study published online June 18 in Pediatrics.

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Menhibrix Approved to Prevent Bacterial Infections in Infants

FRIDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- The combination vaccine Menhibrix has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to prevent two deadly bacterial infections among infants and toddlers -- Neisseria meningitides serogroups C and Y and Haemophilus influenzae type b.

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Roseola Virus Associated With Febrile Status Epilepticus

FRIDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- The roseola virus, human herpesvirus (HHV)-6B and HHV-7, is associated with febrile status epilepticus (FSE), with HHV infection seen in approximately one-third of FSE cases in young children, according to a study published online June 14 in Epilepsia.

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CDC: Preventive Health Services Underused Before 2010

THURSDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Prior to 2010, only about half of all U.S. adults received key preventive health services, according to a report published in the June 15 supplement of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Socioeconomic Correlates of Plague ID'd in New Mexico

THURSDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- Changing socioeconomic indicators seem to correlate with temporal changes in the distribution of Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis) cases in New Mexico, according to a study published in the July issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infectious Diseases.

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Whole-Genome Sequencing Can Identify MRSA Outbreaks

WEDNESDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- High throughput, whole-genome sequencing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates can provide important phylogenetic information in a clinically relevant time frame, according to a study published in the June 14 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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T Cell Receptor 'Clonotypes' Key to HIV-1 Infection Control

WEDNESDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- The association of particular human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) with the ability of some individuals to control HIV-1 infection is modulated by clones of T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) with specific phenotypes (clonotypes), according to a study published online June 10 in Nature Immunology.

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Gender Gap Exists in Physician Researchers' Salaries

TUESDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- A survey of mid-career academic physician researchers shows that gender differences in salary exist even after adjusting for differences in specialty, institutional characteristics, academic productivity, academic rank, and work hours, according to a study published in the June 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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MRSA Colonization Up in Contacts of Staph-Infected Children

THURSDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Household contacts of children with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) appear to have higher rates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonization compared to the general population, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Multidrug-Resistance Seen in ~10 Percent of TB Cases in China

WEDNESDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- About one in 10 patients with tuberculosis in China has multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis; and a new drug, delamanid, is significantly better than placebo for increasing sputum-culture conversion at two months in patients with MDR tuberculosis, according to two studies published in the June 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Low Risk of Herpes Zoster Recurrence in Elderly

WEDNESDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- For older immunocompetent adults, the risk of herpes zoster recurrence following a recent initial episode is fairly low in both vaccinated and unvaccinated cohorts, according to a study published online June 4 in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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