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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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June 2012 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: July 02, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for June 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Nelarabine Plus Chemo Viable in Children With T-Cell ALL

FRIDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of children with newly-diagnosed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) with nelarabine, in addition to an intensive Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM) 86-based chemotherapy regimen, is feasible and safe, according to a study published online June 25 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Abstract
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Biophysical Abnormalities Seen in Aorta of Obese Children

FRIDAY, June 29 (HealthDay News) -- Obese children have abnormal measurements of the biophysical properties of the aorta, reflecting increased aortic stiffness and early cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online June 25 in The American Journal of Cardiology.

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Supreme Court Upholds Health Care Reform Law

THURSDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Supreme Court voted June 28 to uphold the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), which has been the subject of debate and multiple lawsuits since its 2010 inception.

More Information

Risk of Second Primary Melanoma Up in Pediatric Patients

THURSDAY, June 28 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric patients diagnosed with an invasive cutaneous melanoma have nearly double the relative risk of developing a subsequent primary melanoma, compared with adults, according to a study published online June 20 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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iPad May Alter Programmable Shunt Valve Settings

WEDNESDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to a tablet device may result in a change to programmable shunt valve settings when the tablet is very close to the valve, according to a study published online June 26 in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics.

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Prenatal Exposure to Butylbenzyl Phthalate Linked to Eczema

WEDNESDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Prenatal exposure to butylbenzyl phthalate (BBzP), as assessed by increased concentrations of monobenzyl phthalate (MBzP) in the urine, is associated with an increased risk of early-onset eczema in offspring, according to a study published online June 26 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

Abstract
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Home-Based Intervention Linked to Lower BMI at Age 2

WEDNESDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- A home-based intervention comprising eight visits from trained nurses to new mothers in the pre- and postnatal period is associated with lower body mass index (BMI) in children at age 2, according to a study published online June 26 in BMJ.

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Duplicate Payments by Federal Government Increasing

WEDNESDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- The federal government spends a substantial and increasing amount on individuals who are dually enrolled in separate managed care programs (the Veterans Affairs health care system [VA] and Medicare Advantage plan [MA]), according to a study published online June 26 in the Journal of the American Medical Association to coincide with presentation at the Annual Research Meeting of AcademyHealth, held from June 24 to 26 in Orlando, Fla.

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Use of Electronic Records Tied to Fewer Malpractice Claims

TUESDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- Use of electronic health records (EHRs) is associated with fewer medical malpractice claims among physicians from multiple surgical and medical specialties, according to a research letter published online June 25 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Steroid-Free Regimen Post-Pediatric Renal Transplant Safe

TUESDAY, June 26 (HealthDay News) -- A steroid-free approach to immunosuppression following pediatric renal transplants is safe and effective, according to a study published online June 13 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

Abstract
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Unhealthy Food Predominates Youth Sports, Parents Report

MONDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Parents report dissatisfaction with the lack of healthy food and beverage choices available at youth sports settings, according to a study published online April 16 in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

Abstract
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Early Vaccinations Not Linked to Celiac Disease in Sweden

MONDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Early vaccinations do not seem to influence the risk of celiac disease (CD) among infants, nor do changes in the vaccination program explain the CD epidemic, according to a Swedish study published online June 25 in Pediatrics.

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Accidental Exposure Causes Most Reactions in Allergic Infants

MONDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- For infants with documented or likely allergies to milk or eggs, most allergic reactions result from accidental exposures, according to a study published online June 25 in Pediatrics.

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Early Start to ADHD Meds Lowers Risk of Academic Decline

MONDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- Earlier initiation of stimulant treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with a lower risk of decline in academic performance, according to a study published online June 25 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Antimicrobials Tied to Allergic Sensitization in Children

FRIDAY, June 22 (HealthDay News) -- Antimicrobial endocrine-disrupting compounds commonly found in toothpaste and cosmetics are associated with a higher risk of allergic sensitization in children, according to a study published online June 18 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Abstract
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Parents Overestimate Deformity-Related Stress in Scoliosis

THURSDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with idiopathic adolescent scoliosis and their parents perceive the emotional stress connected to brace treatment in the same way, but parents overestimate the stress related to body deformity, according to a study published in the June 15 issue of Spine.

Abstract
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Half of Residents Report Working While Sick

THURSDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- About half of residents have worked while sick, with many reporting feeling obligated to colleagues and patients, according to a research letter published online June 18 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Early Loss of Glucagon Response to Hypoglycemia Found in Teens

THURSDAY, June 21 (HealthDay News) -- In adolescents with type 1 diabetes the glucagon response to hypoglycemia is lost as early as one month and at a median of eight months after diabetes diagnosis, according to a study published online June 14 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
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Multi-Drug Regimens Cut HIV Transmission Versus Zidovudine

WEDNESDAY, June 20 (HealthDay News) -- For infants of mothers with HIV who did not receive antenatal antiretroviral therapy (ART), treatment with two or three drugs reduces transmission compared with zidovudine alone; and more infants treated with nevirapine together with zidovudine and lamivudine have virologic failure by six months, according to two studies published in the June 21 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract - Nielsen-Saines
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Abstract - Violari
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Pediatric Hospitalizations for HTN Up From 1997 to 2006

MONDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- The number of children with hypertension-related hospitalizations in the United States increased significantly from 1997 to 2006, with the fraction of inpatient charges attributed to hypertension also significantly increased, according to a study published online June 18 in Hypertension.

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Editorial

More Parents Not Adhering to Vaccine Schedule

MONDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- The number of children consistently delaying vaccinations in Portland increased more than three-fold from 2006 to 2009, according to a study published online June 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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A Shift in Pediatric Drug Utilization Seen 2002 to 2010

MONDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- From 2002 to 2010 there was a 7 percent decrease in outpatient pediatric prescription medication utilization, due in part to a decrease in antibiotics and allergy medication prescriptions, according to a study published online June 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Sports-Related Kidney Injuries Rare in High School Athletes

MONDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Sports-related kidney injuries occur significantly less frequently than other injuries in high school athletes, according to a study published online June 18 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Patterns of Unprofessional Behavior by Hospitalists ID'd

MONDAY, June 18 (HealthDay News) -- Hospitalist participation in unprofessional behavior is generally low, and is associated with job characteristics, age, and site, according to a systematic review published online May 16 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Abstract
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Younger Adult Cancer Survivors in Poorer Health Than Peers

FRIDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer survivors -- those ages 15 to 29 years at their first diagnosis -- report higher rates of unhealthy behaviors, chronic medical conditions, and less access to health care than respondents who never had cancer, and may be at risk for poor long-term health outcomes, according to a study published online June 11 in Cancer.

Abstract
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Menhibrix Approved to Prevent Bacterial Infections in Infants

FRIDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- The combination vaccine Menhibrix has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to prevent two deadly bacterial infections among infants and toddlers -- Neisseria meningitides serogroups C and Y and Haemophilus influenzae type b.

FDA

Roseola Virus Associated With Febrile Status Epilepticus

FRIDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- The roseola virus, human herpesvirus (HHV)-6B and HHV-7, is associated with febrile status epilepticus (FSE), with HHV infection seen in approximately one-third of FSE cases in young children, according to a study published online June 14 in Epilepsia.

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Child Food Allergy Prevalence Linked to Urban/Rural Status

FRIDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of childhood food allergy is associated with urban/rural status, even after adjusting for confounding variables, according to a study published online May 17 in Clinical Pediatrics.

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New Tool Identifies Teens With Impaired Fasting Glucose

FRIDAY, June 15 (HealthDay News) -- More effective than body mass index (BMI) alone, the Tool for Assessing Glucose Impairment (TAG-IT) for adolescents (TAG-IT-A) is a simple screening tool that identifies adolescents who may have impaired fasting glucose, according to a study published in the June issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Mental Health Disorders Up Long-Term Opioid Use in Youth

THURSDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- When presenting with a new episode of chronic pain, the presence of preexisting mental health disorders is associated with an increased risk of long-term opioid pain use, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Abstract
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Autologous Recellularization of a Vein Transplant Feasible

THURSDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- A new technique involving recellularization of a deceased donor vein graft with autologous stem cells may be a viable option for patients who require a vein graft, according to a proof-of-concept study published online June 14 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Single-Leg Spica Cast Effective for Child Femoral Fractures

THURSDAY, June 14 (HealthDay News) -- For young children with diaphyseal femoral fractures, treatment with a single-leg spica cast is safe and effective, and facilitates patient care and function compared with double-leg spica casting, according to a study published online June 13 in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Cerebral Damage Key Risk for Visual Impairment in Preemies

WEDNESDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- Cerebral damage and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) are both independent risk factors for visual impairment in preschool children who were born extremely premature, with cerebral damage being the primary risk factor, according to a study published online June 11 in the Archives of Ophthalmology.

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Life-Long Rx Not Always Needed for Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy

WEDNESDAY, June 13 (HealthDay News) -- Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a heterogeneous epilepsy syndrome and life-long antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment is not required in all patients to maintain seizure freedom, according to a study published online June 12 in Epilepsia.

Abstract
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Gender Gap Exists in Physician Researchers' Salaries

TUESDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- A survey of mid-career academic physician researchers shows that gender differences in salary exist even after adjusting for differences in specialty, institutional characteristics, academic productivity, academic rank, and work hours, according to a study published in the June 13 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Outdoor Physical Activity Ups Quality of Life for Teens

TUESDAY, June 12 (HealthDay News) -- Over a five-year period, adolescents in the highest tertile of physical activity have a higher health-related quality of life (QoL) compared with their less-active counterparts, while the converse is true for screen viewing time, according to a study published online June 11 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Effects of In Utero Smoke Exposure Seen in Teens

MONDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- In utero smoke exposure is associated with poor asthma control and early-onset asthma in children assessed at 8 to 17 years of age, according to a study published in the June issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Abstract
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~8 Percent of Children Engage in Nonsuicidal Self-Injury

MONDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) occurs in about 8 percent of children and adolescents and the prevalence is highest among ninth-grade girls, who tend to engage in cutting or carving of the skin, according to a study published online June 11 in Pediatrics.

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In Preemies, Maternal Smoking Tied to Necrotizing Enterocolitis

MONDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal smoking has been identified as a risk factor associated with the development of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature infants, according to a study published June 11 in Pediatrics.

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Cycled Lighting Improves Neonates' Behavior, Outcomes

MONDAY, June 11 (HealthDay News) -- Cycled lighting (CL) during neonatal care reduces an infant's fussing and crying behavior at 5 and 11 weeks' corrected age and correlates with a trend toward higher motor activity during daytime and improved weight gain, compared with dim lighting (DL) conditions, according to a study published online June 11 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Approximately 11 Percent of Global Live Births Are Preterm

FRIDAY, June 8 (HealthDay News) -- The global burden of preterm birth is considerable, representing 11.1 percent of all live births worldwide, according to a study published in the June 9 issue of The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Treating Teen Depression May Reduce Subsequent Drug Abuse

THURSDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents can reduce the likelihood of subsequent substance use disorders (SUD), but does not reduce alcohol use disorders (AUD), according to a study published in the April issue of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology.

Abstract
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CT Scans Up Risk of Leukemia, Brain Tumors in Young

THURSDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- For children and young adults, radiation from computed tomography (CT) scans is linked to an increased risk of leukemia and brain tumors, although the absolute risks are small, according to a study published online June 7 in The Lancet.

Abstract
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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Early Rapid Growth Partly Mediates Genetic Obesity Risk

THURSDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Developmental phenotypes partially mediate the link between genetic predisposition and adult obesity, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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High-Fiber Diets Linked to Lower Visceral Fat in Teens

THURSDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents who consume more dietary fiber have lower visceral adiposity and lower levels of some inflammatory biomarkers, according to a study published online May 16 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Abstract
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MRSA Colonization Up in Contacts of Staph-Infected Children

THURSDAY, June 7 (HealthDay News) -- Household contacts of children with Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) appear to have higher rates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) colonization compared to the general population, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Racial Difference in Effect of Physical Activity on Obesity

WEDNESDAY, June 6 (HealthDay News) -- Black adolescent girls are less sensitive to the effects of physical activity in preventing obesity than are white girls, according to a study published in the June issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

Abstract
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Childhood Famine Increases Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

TUESDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- Even a short period of moderate or severe undernutrition or famine during childhood or adolescence can increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in adulthood, according to research published online May 29 in Diabetes.

Abstract
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Head Lice Beginning to Show Permethrin Resistance

TUESDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- Although live head lice obtained from school-aged children in Paris remain susceptible to the insecticide malathion, approximately 14 percent have been found to be resistant to permethrin, suggesting a strong basis for future insecticide resistance, according to research published online May 24 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Abstract
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Management of Acetaminophen Overdose in Children Reviewed

TUESDAY, June 5 (HealthDay News) -- Due to the widespread use of acetaminophen, overdose is a concern, particularly for infants and children, who have developmental differences in their hepatic metabolism that affect hepatotoxicity, according to a review published online June 4 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Most Mothers Don't Reach Desired Breastfeeding Duration

MONDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- Most mothers who want to exclusively breastfeed intend to do so for at least three months, but two-thirds of those who intend to breastfeed exclusively are not meeting their intended duration goals, according to a study published online June 4 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Low-Birth-Weight Teens Report Health Similar to Peers

MONDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents born with extremely low birth weight (ELBW) in the 1990s assess their current health and well-being similarly to teens born at normal birth weight but report less risk taking, according to a study published online June 4 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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Not Enough Pediatricians Providing Lifestyle Counseling

MONDAY, June 4 (HealthDay News) -- Less than half of adolescents are advised by their pediatric health care provider to eat healthily and exercise more, but rates of counseling are higher among obese teens, according to a study published online June 4 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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