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ENDO: Male Contraceptive Gel Suppresses Spermatogenesis

Last Updated: July 02, 2012.

 

Gel containing combination of testosterone and Nestorone is more effective than testosterone alone

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A gel containing a combination of testosterone and Nestorone is effective for suppressing spermatogenesis, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of The Endocrine Society, held from June 23 to 26 in Houston.

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- A gel containing a combination of testosterone (T) and Nestorone (NES) is effective for suppressing spermatogenesis, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of The Endocrine Society, held from June 23 to 26 in Houston.

Niloufar Ilani, M.D., from the Harbor-University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, and colleagues investigated the effectiveness of T gel alone or in combination with NES for suppressing spermatogenesis. Participants included 99 healthy male volunteers who were randomly allocated to apply daily transdermal gel (T 10 mg + NES 0 mg; T 10 mg + NES 8 mg; and T 10 mg + NES 12 mg). Analyses were performed on 56 men who adhered to the protocol and completed 20 weeks of treatment.

The researchers found that there was a significantly higher percentage of men whose sperm concentration was ≤1 million/mL with T+NES 8 mg and T+NES 12 mg compared with T+NES 0 mg (88 and 89 percent, respectively, versus 23 percent). In the T+NES 8 mg and T+NES 12 mg groups, significantly more men became azoospermic compared with the T+NES 0 mg group (78 and 69 percent, respectively, versus 23 percent). Irrespective of treatment group, the total and free T concentrations remained within the adult male range. During the recovery period all subjects recovered to a sperm concentration of ≥15 million/mL. There were minimal adverse effects observed in all groups.

"While this gel has great potential and minimal side effects, it does warrant further study as a male contraceptive," a coauthor said in a statement.

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