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ENDO: Male Contraceptive Gel Suppresses Spermatogenesis

Last Updated: July 02, 2012.

A gel containing a combination of testosterone and Nestorone is effective for suppressing spermatogenesis, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of The Endocrine Society, held from June 23 to 26 in Houston.

 

Gel containing combination of testosterone and Nestorone is more effective than testosterone alone

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MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- A gel containing a combination of testosterone (T) and Nestorone (NES) is effective for suppressing spermatogenesis, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of The Endocrine Society, held from June 23 to 26 in Houston.

Niloufar Ilani, M.D., from the Harbor-University of California Los Angeles Medical Center, and colleagues investigated the effectiveness of T gel alone or in combination with NES for suppressing spermatogenesis. Participants included 99 healthy male volunteers who were randomly allocated to apply daily transdermal gel (T 10 mg + NES 0 mg; T 10 mg + NES 8 mg; and T 10 mg + NES 12 mg). Analyses were performed on 56 men who adhered to the protocol and completed 20 weeks of treatment.

The researchers found that there was a significantly higher percentage of men whose sperm concentration was ≤1 million/mL with T+NES 8 mg and T+NES 12 mg compared with T+NES 0 mg (88 and 89 percent, respectively, versus 23 percent). In the T+NES 8 mg and T+NES 12 mg groups, significantly more men became azoospermic compared with the T+NES 0 mg group (78 and 69 percent, respectively, versus 23 percent). Irrespective of treatment group, the total and free T concentrations remained within the adult male range. During the recovery period all subjects recovered to a sperm concentration of ≥15 million/mL. There were minimal adverse effects observed in all groups.

"While this gel has great potential and minimal side effects, it does warrant further study as a male contraceptive," a coauthor said in a statement.

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