Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Gastroenterology | Internal Medicine | Emergency Medicine | Nursing | Rheumatology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Gastrointestinal Perforation Rare in Rheumatoid Arthritis

Last Updated: July 06, 2012.

 

Main risk factors for GI perforations include age, history of diverticulitis, glucocorticoid use

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Gastrointestinal perforation is a rare but serious condition that affects patients with rheumatoid arthritis, most frequently in the lower gastrointestinal tract, according to a study published online June 21 in Arthritis Care & Research.

FRIDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Gastrointestinal (GI) perforation is a rare but serious condition that affects patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), most frequently in the lower GI tract, according to a study published online June 21 in Arthritis Care & Research.

Jeffrey R. Curtis, M.D., M.P.H., from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and colleagues analyzed health insurance claims data to identify the incidence and risk factors for GI perforation among 143,433 RA patients.

Using a maximally sensitive definition for GI perforation, the researchers identified 696 hospitalizations with perforation, representing a rate of 1.70 per 1,000 person-years, which was lower when a more specific definition was used (0.87 per 1,000 person years). Eighty-three percent of perforations occurred in the lower GI tract. Age and diverticulitis were the strongest risk factors for perforation (hazard ratios for diverticulitis: 14.5 for the more sensitive definition and 3.9 for the more specific definition). The risk of GI perforation was highest among patients with exposure to concomitant non-biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and glucocorticoids, compared to methotrexate. Use of biologics without glucocorticoids was not a risk factor.

"Clinicians should be aware of risk factors for GI perforation when managing RA patients, including age, history of diverticulitis, and use of glucocorticoids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies; one author is an employee of Genentech.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: ESHRE: Perinatal Mortality Down With Single Embryo Transfer Next: Sentinel Node Biopsy Safe for Vulvar Squamous Cell Cancer

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.