Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Orthopedics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Resistance Training Improves Some Inflammatory Markers

Last Updated: July 11, 2012.

 

Resting levels of C-reactive protein significantly reduced independent of weight loss

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Resistance training can reduce visceral fat and alter levels of certain inflammatory markers, according to research published in the July issue of Obesity Reviews.

WEDNESDAY, July 11 (HealthDay News) -- Resistance training (RT) can reduce visceral fat and alter levels of certain inflammatory markers, according to research published in the July issue of Obesity Reviews.

Barbara Strasser, Ph.D., M.P.H., of the University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology in Hall in Tirol, Austria, and colleagues conducted a literature review to examine the importance of RT on abdominal obesity, visceral fat, and inflammatory response. Twenty-eight studies were identified that evaluated the effects of RT compared with non-exercise controls or aerobic endurance training alone or in combination with caloric restriction.

Overall, the researchers found that, while some trials indicated reductions in visceral fat, the physiological impact was unclear. However, there was good evidence to suggest that RT does slow the rate of visceral fat accumulation over time. Resting serum C-reactive protein levels were significantly reduced with RT, independent of weight loss. RT also tended to improve adiponectin and leptin profiles, but the impact on inflammatory cytokines was unclear.

"In conclusion, although some reports show statistically significant reductions in visceral fat, it is unclear if the magnitude of these changes [is] physiologically meaningful and if they are independent of dietary influence," the authors write. "Hence, long-term RT could be an effective way to prevent or delay abdominal obesity and inflammatory chronic diseases."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Legalization of Euthanasia Has Not Altered Prevalence Next: Alcohol Intake Attenuates Bone Turnover After Menopause

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.