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AOSSM: Femoral Acetabular Impingement Tied to Hernia

Last Updated: July 13, 2012.

Having a femoral acetabular impingement seems to be a contributory factor to sports hernias, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, held from July 12 to 15 in Baltimore.

FRIDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Having a femoral acetabular impingement (FAI) seems to be a contributory factor to sports hernias, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, held from July 12 to 15 in Baltimore.

Kostas Economopoulos, M.D., from the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, and colleagues retrospectively reviewed magnetic resonance images, computed tomography scans, and plain X-rays of 43 patients with sports hernias who underwent 56 surgical repairs, from 1999 to 2011, to examine the prevalence of radiologic signs of FAI.

In 86 percent of patients the researchers identified radiologic evidence of FAI in at least one hip. Of these patients, 67 percent had isolated Cam lesions, 5 percent had isolated Pincer lesions, and 14 percent had combined Cam and Pincer lesions. The average alpha-angle of hips was 75 degrees on the side of the hernia and 61 degrees on the side without a hernia. Pincer lesions were found in 16.1 and 7.1 percent of hips with and without associated hernias, respectively. The average acetabular retroversion was 13 degrees in hips with associated hernias and 16 degrees in hips without hernias.

"We hope that our study encourages physicians who see sports hernia and chronic groin pain in athletes to further investigate the possibility of FAI and in turn can recommend better treatment options for this puzzling condition," Economopoulos said in a statement.

Abstract - No. 26
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