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One in Five Women Has Re-Op After Breast Cancer Surgery

Last Updated: July 13, 2012.

 

Re-op significantly more likely among women with carcinoma in situ versus isolated invasive disease

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Twenty percent of women who undergo breast conserving surgery in England undergo reoperation, which is significantly more likely for women with carcinoma in situ versus isolated invasive disease, according to a study published July 12 in BMJ.

FRIDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Twenty percent of women who undergo breast conserving surgery in England undergo reoperation, which is significantly more likely for women with carcinoma in situ versus isolated invasive disease, according to a study published July 12 in BMJ.

Ranjeet Jeevan, from the Royal College of Surgeons in London, and colleagues examined whether the rates of reoperation correlated with patient characteristics in a cohort of 55,297 women who underwent primary breast conserving surgery in 156 National Health Service (NHS) Trusts from April 2005 through March 2008.

The researchers found that 20 percent of the women had at least one reoperation, and 18.5 percent had only one reoperation. Of those who had only one reoperation, 10.7 and 7.7 percent had another breast conserving procedure and a mastectomy, respectively. Eighteen percent of the 45,793 women with isolated invasive disease had at least one reoperation, compared with 29.5 percent of the 9,504 women with carcinoma in situ (adjusted odds ratio, 1.9). There were considerable differences in the adjusted reoperation rates between different NHS trusts.

"Cosmetic outcomes after surgery for breast cancer are an important consideration, and women should be made aware of the local rates of reoperation after primary breast conserving surgery, along with the likelihood of proceeding to mastectomy," the authors write.

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Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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