Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Neurology | Orthopedics | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Most Idiopathic Toe-Walkers Stop Spontaneously by Age 5.5 Years

Last Updated: July 23, 2012.

 

Toe-walking prevalence higher among children with developmental delay, neuropsychiatric diagnosis

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Idiopathic toe-walking at age 5.5 years is more prevalent among children with a neuropsychiatric diagnosis or developmental delay, according to a study published online July 23 in Pediatrics.

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Idiopathic toe-walking at age 5.5 years is more prevalent among children with a neuropsychiatric diagnosis or developmental delay, according to a study published online July 23 in Pediatrics.

Pähr Engström, M.D., and Kristina Tedroff, M.D., Ph.D., from the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, assessed 1,436 5.5-year-old children (750 boys and 686 girls) for walking on their toes. An additional 35 5.5-year-old children with special needs were evaluated; 17 of these children had a cognitive or neuropsychiatric disorder but no motor disorder.

The researchers found that 30 children (2.1 percent; 20 boys and 10 girls) were active toe-walkers at age 5.5 years. Forty children (2.8 percent; 22 boys and 18 girls) were no longer walking on their toes but previously had and were considered inactive toe-walkers. At age 5.5 years, the total prevalence (active and inactive) of toe-walking was 70 of 1,436 children (4.9 percent), but the total prevalence was much higher for children with a neuropsychiatric diagnosis or developmental delay (seven of 17; 41.2 percent).

"This study establishes the prevalence and early spontaneous course of idiopathic toe-walking in 5.5-year-old children. At this age, more than half of the children have spontaneously ceased to walk on their toes," the authors write. "This study confirms earlier findings that toe-walking has a high prevalence among children with a cognitive disorder."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Study Examines Effect of Trisomy 13, 18 on Families, Providers Next: Children Continue to Be Underrepresented in Drug Trials

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.