Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Gynecology | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Effects of Heavy Alcohol Exposure During Pregnancy Evaluated

Last Updated: July 24, 2012.

 

About 80 percent of exposed children have at least one abnormality linked to alcohol exposure

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Binge drinking and total alcohol intake during pregnancy correlate with child abnormalities linked to alcohol exposure, according to a study published online July 23 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Binge drinking and total alcohol intake during pregnancy correlate with child abnormalities linked to alcohol exposure, according to a study published online July 23 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

Devon Kuehn, M.D., from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development in Bethesda, Md., and colleagues examined the presence of components of fetal alcohol syndrome in a prospective cohort study involving 101 Chilean women, identified during their first prenatal appointment, who consumed at least four drinks/day (exposed) and 101 matched women with no reported alcohol consumption during pregnancy (unexposed). Children were evaluated up to 8.5 years of age.

The researchers identified at least one functional central nervous system abnormality in 44 percent of exposed children and 13.6 percent of unexposed. Growth restriction was noted in significantly more exposed than unexposed children (27.2 versus 12.5 percent), as was the presence of abnormal facial features (17.3 versus 1.1 percent). Only 20.3 percent of the 59 exposed children with data available to detect at least one abnormality had no abnormalities. Binge drinking from conception to recognition of pregnancy and after recognition of pregnancy correlated significantly with abnormal child outcome (odds ratio, 1.48 and 1.41 per day, respectively). Total number of drinks consumed per week from conception to recognition of pregnancy also correlated significantly with abnormal child outcome (odds ratio, 1.02 per drink; P = 0.0009).

"After exposure to heavy alcohol consumption during pregnancy, 80 percent of children had one or more abnormalities associated with alcohol exposure," the authors write. "Functional neurologic impairment occurred most frequently and may be the only sign to alert physicians to prenatal alcohol exposure."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: AHA: Modification of Stem Cells Promising for Heart Failure Next: AHA: Low-Voltage Mapping for AVNRT Feasible in Children

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.