Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Gynecology | Nursing | Institutional

Back to Journal Articles

CDC: No Change in Proportion of Unintended Births in U.S.

Last Updated: July 24, 2012.

 

Proportion unchanged since 1982; decrease noted for married, non-Hispanic white women

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
The proportion of unintended births in the United States has remained unchanged from 1982, and was about 37 percent in 2006 to 2010, according to a report issued July 24 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics.

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- The proportion of unintended births in the United States has remained unchanged from 1982, and was about 37 percent in 2006 to 2010, according to a report issued July 24 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

William D. Mosher, Ph.D., from the Division of Vital Statistics at the NCHS in Hyattsville, Md., and colleagues used data from the 2006 to 2010 National Survey of Family Growth, including in-person interviews with 12,279 women aged 15 to 44 years, to report trends in unintended pregnancies. Trends were compared with those from surveys conducted in 1982, 1988, 1995, and 2002.

The researchers found that, at the time of conception, approximately 37 percent of births in the United States were unintended, with no significant decrease seen in the overall proportion since 1982. Between 1982 and 2006 to 2010 there was a significant decrease in the proportion of unintended births to married, non-Hispanic white women. However, there was an increase in the proportion of all births occurring to unmarried women, from 18 percent in 1980 to 41 percent in 2009. The percentage of unintended births differed widely between groups; unintended births were much more likely among unmarried, black women and women with less education or income than among married, white, college-educated, and high-income women. Births to married women were more likely to be intended than births to unmarried women, as were births to women aged 25 to 44 compared to younger women.

"Despite a decrease in unintended births to ever-married non-Hispanic white women, the growing proportion of births to unmarried women, most of which were unintended, has kept the overall proportion of unintended births approximately constant," the authors write.

More Information

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Altered Brain Structure Seen in Institutionalized Children Next: Researchers Find New Treatment Promising for Tuberculosis

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.