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Researchers Find New Treatment Promising for Tuberculosis

Last Updated: July 24, 2012.

 

Early bactericidal activity study identified PA-824-moxifloxacin-pyrazinamide as potential therapy

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Based on early bactericidal activity studies, PA-824-moxifloxacin-pyrazinamide may be suitable for development as an anti-tuberculosis agent, according to a study published online July 23 in The Lancet.

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Based on early bactericidal activity (EBA) studies, PA-824-moxifloxacin-pyrazinamide may be suitable for development as an anti-tuberculosis agent, according to a study published online July 23 in The Lancet.

Andreas H. Diacon, M.D., from Stellenbosch University in Cape Town, South Africa, and colleagues assessed the suitability for future development of new multiple-agent combinations over the first 14 days of treatment in treatment-naive, drug-susceptible patients with uncomplicated pulmonary tuberculosis. Patients were randomly allocated to receive bedaquiline, bedaquiline-pyrazinamide, PA-824-pyrazinamide, bedaquiline-PA-824, PA-824-moxifloxacin-pyrazinamide, or unmasked standard anti-tuberculosis treatment, and the EBA was assessed.

The researchers found that the mean 14-day EBA for PA-824-moxifloxacin-pyrazinamide was comparable to that of standard treatment and was significantly higher than that of bedaquiline, bedaquiline-pyrazinamide, and bedaquiline-PA-824, but not PA-824-pyrazinamide. Treatments appeared safe and were well tolerated. One patient was withdrawn from PA-824-moxifloxacin-pyrazinamide due to excessive corrected QT interval changes.

"A regimen not containing isoniazid and rifampicin would represent a substantial step towards a new regimen with low interaction potential suitable for both fully drug-susceptible and multidrug resistant tuberculosis," the authors write. "With this study the path to the construction of new regimens becomes clearer."

One author disclosed being a consultant to Otsuka and Tibotec regarding development of anti-tuberculosis agents.

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Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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