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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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July 2012 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: August 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for July 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Higher Rates of Pertussis With Acellular Pertussis Vaccine

TUESDAY, July 31 (HealthDay News) -- Children who receive acellular pertussis vaccines have higher rates of pertussis compared with those receiving whole cell pertussis vaccines, according to a research letter published in the Aug. 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Depression Triples Between Ages 12 and 15 in Girls in U.S.

MONDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- An average of 12.0 percent of girls aged 12 to 17 years have experienced a major depressive episode (MDE) in the past year, with the rates tripling for girls between the ages of 12 and 15, according to a report published July 19 by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Early Mediterranean Diet Benefits Arteries in Adulthood

MONDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern in early life is associated with lower arterial stiffness in adulthood, according to a study published online July 19 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Time Outdoors May Reduce Myopia in Children

MONDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Increasing time spent outdoors may reduce the development or progression of myopia in children and adolescents, according to a study published online July 20 in Ophthalmology.

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Emotional Abuse of Children Prevalent, Yet Hard to Prevent

MONDAY, July 30 (HealthDay News) -- Health care providers can help to promote sensitive and attuned parenting using a range of educational strategies to support families that are at risk for, or show evidence of, psychological mistreatment of children, according to a clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published online July 30 in Pediatrics.

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MRSA Skin Infections Up, Linked to Furunculosis

FRIDAY, July 27 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in the United States is increasing and is associated with follicular infection, most commonly folliculitis followed by furunculosis, according to a review published online July 16 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Excess Maternal Iodine Linked to Congenital Hypothyroidism

THURSDAY, July 26 (HealthDay News) -- Excess maternal iodine supplementation can result in congenital hypothyroidism, according to a study published online July 26 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Study Assesses Cardio Risk Factors in Severely Obese Children

WEDNESDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly two-thirds of severely obese children aged 12 or younger have at least one cardiovascular risk factor, according to a study published online July 23 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Younger Cancer Patients' Psychosocial Needs Unmet

WEDNESDAY, July 25 (HealthDay News) -- Substantial proportions of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients are not getting their psychosocial needs met, particularly in adult care settings, according to a study published in a supplement to the May 15 issue of Cancer.

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CDC: HIV-Risk Behaviors Stable for U.S. High School Students

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Although there were reductions in HIV-related risk behavior among U.S high school students from 1991 to the early 2000s, behaviors have subsequently stabilized, according to research published in the June 24 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report to coincide with the International AIDS Conference, held from July 22 to 27 in Washington, D.C.

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Recommended Tests Poorly Utilized in Hypertensive Teens

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Guideline-recommended diagnostic echocardiograms and renal ultrasonography are poorly utilized in Medicaid-eligible adolescents with essential hypertension, according to research published online July 23 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Effects of Heavy Alcohol Exposure During Pregnancy Evaluated

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Binge drinking and total alcohol intake during pregnancy correlate with child abnormalities linked to alcohol exposure, according to a study published online July 23 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Father-Infant Interactions Predict Behavior Problems

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- The quality of interactions between fathers and their infants may predict the development of behavioral problems in childhood, according to a study published online July 19 in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

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Altered Brain Structure Seen in Institutionalized Children

TUESDAY, July 24 (HealthDay News) -- Romanian children who are institutionalized have less gray and white brain matter, although white matter volume returns to normal levels in children who go into high-quality foster care, according to a study published online July 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Infants at Greatest Risk in 2010 California Pertussis Epidemic

FRIDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- In the 2010 California pertussis epidemic, all deaths and most hospitalizations occurred in infants younger than 3 months of age, according to research published online July 19 in the Journal of Pediatrics.

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Most Idiopathic Toe-Walkers Stop Spontaneously by Age 5.5 Years

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Idiopathic toe-walking at age 5.5 years is more prevalent among children with a neuropsychiatric diagnosis or developmental delay, according to a study published online July 23 in Pediatrics.

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Study Examines Effect of Trisomy 13, 18 on Families, Providers

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Parents of children with trisomy 13 and trisomy 18 (T13-18) who belong to social networks have positive experiences in spite of the difficulties, and report that their children enrich their family life, according to a study published online July 23 in Pediatrics.

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Children Continue to Be Underrepresented in Drug Trials

MONDAY, July 23 (HealthDay News) -- Even for conditions with a high pediatric disease burden, only a small proportion of clinical drug trials study pediatric patients, according to research published online July 23 in Pediatrics.

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Health Benefits of More Stringent Ozone Standard Estimated

FRIDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Achieving more stringent primary ozone standards could lead to considerable reductions in ozone-related premature deaths, acute respiratory symptoms, and lost school days, according to a study published online July 18 in Environmental Health Perspectives.

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Animal Study: Long-Term Ritalin Doesn't Impact Growth

FRIDAY, July 20 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic use of methylphenidate (Ritalin) in young monkeys has no significant effect on growth or the dopamine system, or the likelihood of becoming addicted to cocaine, according to a study published online July 18 in Neuropsychopharmacology.

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Pertussis Reaches Epidemic Level in Washington State

THURSDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Pertussis rates may reach record levels this year in the United States, where Washington state is experiencing an ongoing epidemic, according to a report published in the July 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Specific Paternal Occupations Linked to Risk of Birth Defects

THURSDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Specific paternal occupations correlate with increased risk of birth defects, and maternal occupational exposure to certain solvents correlates with increased risk of congenital heart defects (CHDs), according to two studies published online July 17 in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

Abstract - Desrosiers
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Abstract - Gilboa
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Drop in Children's Milk Intake Not Tied to Sweet Drink Intake

THURSDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Decreased milk consumption in children from fifth grade to eighth grade is not associated with changes in sweetened-beverage consumption, according to a study published online July 18 in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

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Most Doctors Satisfied With Electronic Health Records

THURSDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Although only 55 percent of physicians had adopted electronic health records (EHRs) in 2011, most are somewhat or very satisfied with their system and most report enhanced patient care, according to a July data brief issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).

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Poorer Patient Experience at Safety-Net Hospitals

THURSDAY, July 19 (HealthDay News) -- Safety-net hospitals (SNHs) perform worse on nearly every measure of patient experience, according to a study published online July 16 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Oral Immunotherapy Promising for Children With Egg Allergy

WEDNESDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Oral immunotherapy represents a promising therapeutic intervention for children with egg allergy, according to a study published in the July 19 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Physical Inactivity Accounts for Considerable Disease Burden

WEDNESDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- Physical inactivity has a considerable impact on the burden of major non-communicable diseases, and causes 9 percent of premature mortality worldwide, according to a study published online July 18 in The Lancet.

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Obesity Linked to Economic Status in Developing Countries

WEDNESDAY, July 18 (HealthDay News) -- In low- and middle-income developing countries, socioeconomic status (SES) plays an important role in the development of obesity, particularly in women, according to research published online July 5 in Obesity Reviews.

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Social Network Analysis IDs Informal Physician Networks

TUESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Informal networks among physicians who share patients demonstrate substantial geographic variability, while within networks, physician and patient characteristics are similar, according to a study published in the July 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Missed Sleep May Contribute to Asthma Morbidity

TUESDAY, July 17 (HealthDay News) -- Missed sleep may contribute to asthma morbidity in urban children, according to a study published in the July issue of the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.

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Playing Team Sports Can Reduce Teen Obesity by ~25 Percent

MONDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- High school students who play at least two team sports or walk or bike to school several days a week are less likely to be obese, according to a study published online July 16 in Pediatrics.

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Youth Access to Indoor Tanning Has Decreased Since 2003

MONDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Since 2003 there has been an increase in the number of countries with nationwide indoor tanning legislation restricting access for youth, according to a study published online July 16 in the Archives of Dermatology.

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Macromastia Has Substantial Negative Impact on Teens

MONDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents with macromastia have reduced health-related quality of life, lower self-esteem, more breast-related symptoms, and are at higher risk for disordered eating, compared with their peers, according to a study published online July 16 in Pediatrics.

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Child Abuse Admissions Up During Mortgage Crisis

MONDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- The rates of hospital admissions of children for physical abuse and high-risk traumatic brain injury (TBI) have increased over the past 10 years and appear to be associated with the housing mortgage crisis, according to research published online July 16 in Pediatrics.

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Dental Composite Affects Child Psychosocial Functioning

MONDAY, July 16 (HealthDay News) -- Children with greater exposure to bisphenol-A-glycidyl-methacrylate (bisGMA)-based dental composite exhibit impaired psychosocial functioning compared with children exposed to urethane dimethacrylate-based compomer, according to a study published online July 16 in Pediatrics.

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Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Poorer Lung Function in Children

FRIDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- For children with asthma treated with inhaled corticosteroids, vitamin D deficiency correlates with poorer lung function, compared to that of children with vitamin D sufficiency or insufficiency, according to a study published online July 12 in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Maternal Obesity Linked to Impaired Fetal Iron Transfer

FRIDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal obesity is associated with impaired iron transfer to the fetus, possibly through upregulation of hepcidin, according to a study published online June 21 in the Journal of Perinatology.

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Report Shows Improvements in Child Well-Being in 2011

FRIDAY, July 13 (HealthDay News) -- While the infant mortality rate, premature births, and teen births are declining, more children are living in poverty, according to the federal government's annual statistical report on the well-being of the nation's children and youth.

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Resistance Exercise Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Boys

THURSDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Both aerobic and resistance exercise (without calorie restriction) reduce fat and improve fitness in obese adolescent boys, although only resistance exercise improves insulin sensitivity, according to a study published online June 29 in Diabetes.

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Social Influence, Choice of Friends Impact Teen Obesity

THURSDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Social influence and the tendency to select similar friends both play a role in patterns of obesity among adolescents, according to a study published online June 29 in PLoS One.

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Children With Disabilities More Likely to Experience Violence

THURSDAY, July 12 (HealthDay News) -- Children with disabilities are more likely to be the victims of violence than their nondisabled peers, but the paucity of robust evidence leaves gaps in the field that need to be addressed, according to a study published online July 12 in The Lancet.

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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Flu Shot in Pregnancy Not Tied to Adverse Fetal Outcomes

TUESDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to adjuvanted influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination during pregnancy does not increase the risk of adverse fetal outcomes, and influenza vaccination correlates with a small but significantly increased risk of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS), according to two studies published in the July 11 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract - Pasternak
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Abstract - De Wals
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Exposure to Movie Smoking Has Minimal Impact on Preteens

TUESDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Short exposure to movie smoking in cartoons or family-oriented movies has a minimal effect on preadolescent children's beliefs about smoking, according to a study published online July 9 in Pediatrics.

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Insulin Delivery, Glucose Monitoring Methods Compared

TUESDAY, July 10 (HealthDay News) -- Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) and multiple daily injections (MDI) offer similar improvements in glycemic control in adults with type 1 diabetes, while the addition of real-time continuous glucose monitoring (rt-CGM) improves glycemic control compared with MDI or self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG), according to a review published online July 10 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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UTI Risk Up for Uncircumcised Boys Despite Urethral Visibility

MONDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Circumcised boys have a significantly lower risk of urinary tract infection (UTI) compared with uncircumcised boys, regardless of the degree of visibility of the urethral meatus, according to a study published online July 9 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Classification Rule IDs Four Risk Groups in Scoliosis Progression

MONDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of curvature progression in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) can be based on initial angle of curvature, age, menarcheal status, and height, according to a study published online June 25 in The Spine Journal.

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Babies With Dogs in Home Have Fewer Respiratory Infections

MONDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Frequent contact with dogs during a child's first year of life is associated with fewer respiratory symptoms and infections, less frequent otitis, and the need for fewer antibiotic courses, according to research published online July 9 in Pediatrics.

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Evidence of Herd Immunity After Introduction of HPV Vaccine

MONDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Following introduction of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine there has been a significant decrease in the prevalence of vaccine-type HPV among vaccinated young women and evidence of herd protection in unvaccinated women, according to a study published online July 9 in Pediatrics.

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Prenatal Caffeine Intake Not Linked to Children's Behavior

MONDAY, July 9 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal prenatal caffeine intake is not associated with behavior problems in young children, according to a study published online July 9 in Pediatrics.

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Elementary Student Access to High-Calorie Drinks Declining

FRIDAY, July 6 (HealthDay News) -- Trends suggest that public elementary school student access to sugar-sweetened beverages and non-Institute of Medicine (IOM)-approved competitive beverages have declined significantly from 2006-2007 to 2010-2011, according to a research letter published in the July issue of the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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CDC: Chagas Disease May Be Overlooked in Newborns

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Chagas disease, a parasitic infection that can lead to cardiomyopathy, is usually transmitted by contact with triatomine insects, but it can be passed congenitally, according to a case report published in the July 6 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Poor Coverage, Not Ineffective Vaccine Averts Polio Abolition

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Bivalent and monovalent oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs) are similarly effective, but decreases in vaccine coverage in parts of Pakistan and southern Afghanistan are hampering efforts to eradicate poliomyelitis, according to a study published online July 4 in The Lancet.

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Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Undernutrition Still a Major Issue in Developing Countries

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Although some progress has been made toward meeting Millennium Development Goal 1 (MDG 1) in developing countries, the chances of these countries as a whole meeting the goal are less than 5 percent, according to a study published online July 5 in The Lancet.

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Common Etiology for ASD, Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder

THURSDAY, July 5 (HealthDay News) -- Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder seem to share etiologic factors, with an increased risk of ASD for individuals whose first-degree relatives have schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, according to research published online July 2 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Substance Use Among Teens Peaks During Summer Months

WEDNESDAY, July 4 (HealthDay News) -- In the United States, initiation of substance use among adolescents peaks during the summer months of June and July, according to a July 2 report published by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).

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Handling of Confounding in Diet and Asthma, Allergy Studies Poor

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Studies investigating the effect of diet on the development of childhood asthma and allergies generally have substantial shortcomings with regard to how they handle confounding and effect modification, according to research published online June 19 in Allergy.

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'Sexting' Is Prevalent Among Adolescents

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- More than one in four teenagers report having sent a naked picture of themselves by text or e-mail and about a third have requested a sext, with those who engage in sexting behavior more likely to have begun dating and to have had sex, according to a study published online July 2 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Intermittent Explosive Disorder Is Prevalent Teen Mental Issue

TUESDAY, July 3 (HealthDay News) -- Intermittent explosive disorder (IED) is a highly prevalent, persistent adolescent mental disorder, which is significantly comorbid with a range of other mental disorders, according to a study published online July 2 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Standardized Treatment Plans Developed for New-Onset JIA

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Four standardized consensus treatment plans (CTPs) have been developed for patients with new-onset systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), according to research published in the July issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

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Early Term Birth Linked to Poorer School Performance

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- Children born at term but at 37 or 38 weeks of gestation have poorer achievement scores in reading and math in third grade, according to a study published online July 2 in Pediatrics.

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Behavioral Weight Loss Has Long-Term Benefit for Teens

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- For overweight or obese adolescents, two group-based behavioral weight control interventions, combined with either aerobic activity or activity-based peer therapy, produce sustained improvements in body mass index (BMI) through 24 months, according to a study published online July 2 in Pediatrics.

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Childhood Physical Discipline Linked to Mental Health Issues

MONDAY, July 2 (HealthDay News) -- A significant percentage of mood, anxiety, and personality disorders and substance abuse in U.S. adults can be attributed to harsh physical punishment during childhood, according to research published online July 2 in Pediatrics.

Abstract
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