Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Cardiology | Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Oncology | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Psychological Distress Linked to Increased Mortality

Last Updated: August 01, 2012.

 

Risk of several causes of mortality increased, even at lower levels of psychological distress

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
There is a dose-response association for psychological distress and the risk of several causes of mortality, with increased mortality seen even at lower levels of distress, according to a meta-analysis published July 31 in BMJ.

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 1 (HealthDay News) -- There is a dose-response association for psychological distress and the risk of several causes of mortality, with increased mortality seen even at lower levels of distress, according to a meta-analysis published July 31 in BMJ.

To quantify the link between lower, subclinically symptomatic levels of psychological distress and cause-specific mortality, Tom C. Russ, from the Murray Royal Hospital in Perth, U.K., and colleagues conducted a meta-analysis of 10 large prospective cohort studies from the Health Survey for England involving 68,222 adults. Participants were 35 years or older and free from cardiovascular disease and cancer.

The researchers found that, after adjustment for age and sex, psychological distress correlated with an increased risk of mortality, with a dose-response association seen across the full range of distress severity (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] for General Health Questionnaire scores of 1 to 3 versus 0, 1.20; aHR for scores 4 to 6, 1.43; aHR for scores 7 to 12, 1.94). The association persisted after further adjustment for somatic comorbidity and behavioral and socioeconomic variables. For cardiovascular disease deaths and deaths from external causes a similar association was observed. For cancer death the correlation was only seen at higher levels of psychological distress.

"Depression is a serious and debilitating disorder requiring treatment in its own right, but the finding that any level of psychological distress is associated with increased mortality and an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease, external causes, and cancer (albeit only at higher levels of distress) is highly important," the authors write.

Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Causes of Maternal Intrapartum Fever in Induced Labor ID'd Next: Ongoing Musical Activity Preserves Cognitive Function

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.