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Topical Treatment Shows Potential for Infantile Eczema

Last Updated: August 07, 2012.

 

Cream containing 15(R/S)-methyl-lipoxin A4 relieves severity of eczema, improves quality of life

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Ten days of treatment with a cream containing 15(R/S)-methyl-lipoxin A4 is well tolerated and reduces the severity of infantile eczema, according to a study published online July 26 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

TUESDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Ten days of treatment with a cream containing 15(R/S)-methyl-lipoxin A4 (LXA4) is well tolerated and reduces the severity of infantile eczema, according to a study published online July 26 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Noting that LXA4 and its analogs have been used in treatment of many animal models of inflammatory diseases, Sheng-Hua Wu, M.D., Ph.D., of the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University in China, and colleagues conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving 60 patients with infantile eczema to examine the efficacy of 15(R/S)-methyl-LXA4. Participants were treated with 15(R/S)-methyl-LXA4, mometasone furoate (Elocon), or placebo for 10 days. Scores on the Eczema Area and Severity Index, the Infants' Dermatitis Quality of Life Index, and the Severity Scale Score were used to assess efficacy.

The researchers found that all efficacy measures were significantly improved in patients treated with 15(R/S)-methyl-LXA4 cream, in a similar manner to that of those treated with Elocon. There was a significant and persistent reduction of eczema severity and eczema areas, and improved quality of life was noted. Safety parameters remained within normal limits and there were no adverse events reported.

"This small exploratory study suggests that further investigation of the clinical use of LXA4 analogs in eczema is warranted," the authors conclude.

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