Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Nursing | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Competitive Food Laws Tied to Less BMI Change in Teens

Last Updated: August 13, 2012.

 

Fewer BMI units gained for students in states with strong laws at baseline, and through follow-up

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Exposure to strong state competitive food laws, which regulate the nutrition content of foods and drinks sold outside of federal school meal programs, during childhood is associated with lower body mass index change, according to a study published online Aug. 13 in Pediatrics.

MONDAY, Aug. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to strong state competitive food laws, which regulate the nutrition content of foods and drinks sold outside of federal school meal programs, during childhood is associated with lower body mass index (BMI) change, according to a study published online Aug. 13 in Pediatrics.

Daniel R. Taber, Ph.D., M.P.H., from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and colleagues examined the correlation between competitive food laws and adolescent weight gain. States with competitive food laws were identified and the laws were scored. Based on the law strength and comprehensiveness, states were classified as having strong, weak, or no competitive food laws in 2003 and 2006. In fifth and eighth grade, height and weight data were obtained from 6,300 students participating in the multi-state early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Class.

The researchers found that students exposed to strong laws at baseline gained, on average, 0.25 fewer BMI units. Students in these states were also less likely to remain overweight or obese over time, compared to students in states with no laws. Students who were exposed to consistently strong laws throughout follow-up also gained fewer BMI units. Students exposed to weaker laws in 2006 than in 2003 had similar BMI gain as those students not exposed to laws in either year.

"Laws that regulate competitive food nutrition content may reduce adolescent BMI change if they are comprehensive, contain strong language, and are enacted across grade levels," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Snoring in Young Children Linked to Behavioral Problems Next: Risk of Liver Injury Up With Certain Fluoroquinolones

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.