Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Gastroenterology | Infections | Nursing | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Immune Response to Hep A Vaccine Persists in Children

Last Updated: August 15, 2012.

 

Two-dose shot-induced seropositivity persists for 10+ years, irrespective of maternal anti-HAV status

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Hepatitis A vaccine-induced seropositivity, noted after vaccination of infants younger than 2 years, persists for at least 10 years, according to a study published in the August issue of Hepatology.

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Hepatitis A vaccine-induced seropositivity, noted after vaccination of infants younger than 2 years, persists for at least 10 years, according to a study published in the August issue of Hepatology.

To examine the persistence of seropositivity conferred by hepatitis A vaccine administered to infants, and whether maternal antibodies to hepatitis A virus (maternal anti-HAV) lower the immune response, Umid M. Sharapov, M.D., from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, and colleagues randomly assigned 197 infants and young children to receive a two-dose hepatitis A vaccine at 6 and 12 months (group 1); 12 and 18 months (group 2); and 15 and 21 months (group 3). Within each group, infants were randomized based on their maternal anti-HAV status and were followed for 10 years after the second dose.

The researchers found that, one month after the second dose, children in all groups had evidence of seroprotection, and seroprotective anti-HAV levels persisted in most children at 10 years. The highest geometric mean concentration at 10 years was seen in children born to anti-HAV-negative mothers in group 3, while the lowest geometric mean concentration was seen for children born to anti-HAV-positive mothers in group 1. Through 10 years of follow-up, anti-HAV levels correlated with initial peak anti-HAV levels (tested at one month following the second dose).

"In conclusion, our study demonstrates that seropositivity to hepatitis A persists for at least 10 years after primary vaccination with two-dose inactivated HAV vaccine when administered to children at ages 12 months and older, regardless of their mothers' anti-HAV status," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Long-Term Type 2 Diabetes Ups Pancreatic Cancer Mortality Next: Biomarker Found to Predict Therapy Benefit in Renal Cancer

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.