Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Gynecology | Internal Medicine | Oncology | Pharmacy | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Chemo for Breast Cancer Acceptable During Pregnancy

Last Updated: August 16, 2012.

 

Adverse events more common for infants exposed to chemo in utero; mainly due to premature birth

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
For women diagnosed with early breast cancer during pregnancy, chemotherapy seems acceptable for both mother and infant, with most adverse effects relating to premature birth, according to a study published online Aug. 16 in The Lancet Oncology.

THURSDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For women diagnosed with early breast cancer during pregnancy, chemotherapy seems acceptable for both mother and infant, with most adverse effects relating to premature birth, according to a study published online Aug. 16 in The Lancet Oncology.

Sibylle Loibl, M.D., from the German Breast Group in Neu-Isenburg, and colleagues recruited 413 women (median age, 33 years) with a primary diagnosis of breast cancer during pregnancy (median gestation age at diagnosis, 24 weeks) to examine the safety of breast cancer treatment.

The researchers found that 48 percent of the women received a median of four cycles of chemotherapy during pregnancy, with most receiving an anthracycline. Chemotherapy impacted birth weight, after adjustment for gestational age (P = 0.018), but number of chemotherapy cycles did not (P = 0.71). There was no significant difference between the groups for preterm deliveries before 37 weeks of gestation. Side effects, malformations, or newborn complications were noted in 10 percent of infants and were significantly more common among infants born before 37 weeks of gestation, compared with those born in or after week 37 (16 versus 5 percent). Adverse events were significantly more common among infants exposed to chemotherapy in utero versus unexposed infants (15 versus 4 percent). Two chemotherapy-exposed infants who were delivered prematurely died but the deaths were thought to be unrelated to treatment. The median disease-free survival was 70.6 months for women who started chemotherapy during pregnancy and 94.4 months for those who started after delivery (P = 0.539).

"Because preterm birth was strongly associated with adverse events, a full-term delivery seems to be of paramount importance," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Enzalutamide Prolongs Survival in Resistant Prostate Cancer Next: Exenatide Has Hemodynamic Effects in Healthy Men

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.