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Exenatide Has Hemodynamic Effects in Healthy Men

Last Updated: August 16, 2012.

 

Significant heart rate, cardiac output, peripheral resistance, and sodium:creatinine effects

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The glucagon-like peptide-1 agonist, exenatide, used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, has significant acute hemodynamic effects on healthy volunteers, according to a study published in the September issue of the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

THURSDAY, Aug. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The glucagon-like peptide-1 agonist, exenatide, used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, has significant acute hemodynamic effects on healthy volunteers, according to a study published in the September issue of the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

Buddhike Mendis, M.R.C.P., of the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom, and colleagues conducted a randomized, double-blind, crossover study involving eight healthy adult males (mean age, 24 years) who were administered a single 10 µg subcutaneous injection of exenatide or placebo. Hemodynamic measurements were made for two hours after dosing.

The researchers found exenatide to be associated with significant vascular and cardiac effects, including a mean increase in heart rate of 8.2 beats min−1, an increase of 1.2 L min−1 in cardiac output, and a decrease in total peripheral resistance of 120 dyn s cm−5. The between-group difference in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was not significant. There was a significant mean increase of 12.4 mmol mmol−1 in the urinary sodium:creatinine ratio with exenatide.

"Exenatide has significant hemodynamic effects in healthy volunteers," the authors write. "The results of this study are consistent with exenatide having both vasodilator and natriuretic properties. The vascular changes may contribute to the hypotensive effect of exenatide when used chronically in patients with diabetes."

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