Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Neurology | Nursing | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Brain Damage Linked to Believing Misleading Ads

Last Updated: August 20, 2012.

 

Those with damage to ventromedial prefrontal cortex more likely to believe ads, buy products

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Damage to a particular region of the brain makes individuals more likely to believe a misleading advertisement, which could explain why some elderly fall for fraud schemes, according to a study published online July 9 in Frontiers in Decision Neuroscience.

MONDAY, Aug. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Damage to a particular region of the brain makes individuals more likely to believe a misleading advertisement, which could explain why some elderly fall for fraud schemes, according to a study published online July 9 in Frontiers in Decision Neuroscience.

To investigate the theory that the prefrontal cortex is critical for belief and doubt, Erik Asp, Ph.D., from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, and colleagues presented eight misleading consumer advertisements to 18 patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, 21 patients with damage outside the prefrontal cortex, and 10 demographically similar healthy patients.

The researchers found that, relative to the other two groups, patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex were more likely to believe a misleading advertisement and showed the highest intention to purchase these products. This was true even when the advertisement contained a disclaimer correcting the misleading information.

"The evidence is consistent with our proposal that damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex disrupts a 'false tagging mechanism' which normally produces doubt and skepticism for cognitive representations," Asp and colleagues conclude. "This mechanism could help explain poor financial decision-making when persons with ventromedial prefrontal dysfunction (e.g., caused by neurological injury or aging) are exposed to persuasive information."

Abstract
Full Text

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Post-Polyp Detection, CRC Risk ID'd by Colonoscopy Factors Next: 2012 Indicators of Well-Being for Older Americans Issued

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.