Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Dermatology | Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Oncology | Surgery | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Factors Tied to Photoprotection ID’d for Organ Recipients

Last Updated: August 21, 2012.

 

Patient features and health care provider advice linked to sunscreen use and sun avoidance

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
For organ transplant recipients, patients factors, including sex and skin type, and receipt of advice from health care providers, are both associated with sun protective behaviors, according to a study published online Aug. 9 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

TUESDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For organ transplant recipients, patients factors, including sex and skin type, and receipt of advice from health care providers, are both associated with sun protective behaviors, according to a study published online Aug. 9 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Noting that organ transplant recipients are at increased risk of non-melanoma skin cancers, Eva Mihalis, of Harvard University in Boston, and associates examined the patient and health care factors associated with sun protective behaviors in organ transplant recipients. Data were obtained from a cross-sectional, retrospective survey of 198 U.S. organ recipients, from 2004 to 2008, without prior diagnosis of skin cancer.

The researchers observed a significant increase in overall use of sunscreen after transplantation. In multivariable models, the frequency of post-transplant sunscreen use correlated significantly with sex, Fitzpatrick skin type, pre-transplant use, and receiving advice to avoid sun from a health care provider. Post-transplant sun avoidance correlated significantly with pre-transplantation sun exposure, advice to avoid sun, and pre-transplant sunscreen use.

"Both patient features and clinician advice are associated with sun protective behaviors after organ transplantation," the authors write. "These results help physicians target expanded sun protection counseling to those patients most in need of such intervention."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: 2012 Indicators of Well-Being for Older Americans Issued Next: Family Hx of Early Death Ups Risk of Early Cardiac Disease

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.