Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Dual Effects Noted for Alcohol and Energy Drink Co-Ingestion

Last Updated: August 29, 2012.

 

Energy drinks up alertness, negate some sedation effects of alcohol; can cause overstimulation

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Although consuming alcohol mixed with energy drinks increases alertness and may negate some intoxication-related sedation effects, it can lead to negative physiological and psychological side effects associated with overstimulation, according to a study published online Aug. 15 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Although consuming alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) increases alertness and may negate some intoxication-related sedation effects, it can lead to negative physiological and psychological side effects associated with overstimulation, according to a study published online Aug. 15 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

In an effort to examine the subjective psychological, physiological, and behavioral risk-taking outcomes of AmED consumption compared with alcohol consumption, Amy Peacock, of the University of Tasmania in Hobart, and colleagues surveyed 403 adults aged 18 to 35 years who had consumed AmED and alcohol only in the preceding six months.

The researchers found that, although compared with alcohol-only sessions, participants consumed much more alcohol during AmED sessions, they were significantly less likely to experience disinhibition and risky behaviors. They were also less likely to experience physiological and psychological sedation outcomes. These included speech and walking difficulties, nausea, slurred speech and confusion, exhaustion, and sadness. However, physiological and psychological outcomes associated with overstimulation were significantly increased during AmED sessions. These included heart palpitations, sleep difficulties, agitation, tremors, jot and crash episodes, increased speech speed, irritability, and tension.

"In summary, co-ingestion of energy drinks with alcohol appears to offer a reduction in the experience of sedation outcomes but amplification of adverse stimulation outcomes," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: National Test Identifies Barriers to Organ Donation Next: Subclinical Atherosclerosis Noted in Diffuse Scleroderma

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.