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August 2012 Briefing - Otolaryngology

Last Updated: September 04, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Otolaryngology for August 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Gabapentin Efficacious for Refractory Chronic Cough

TUESDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with refractory chronic cough, treatment with gabapentin is associated with improved cough-specific quality of life and is well-tolerated, according to a study published online Aug. 28 in The Lancet.

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pHDPE Implant Tied to Increased Infection Risk Post-Rhinoplasty

TUESDAY, Aug. 28 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing rhinoplasty, the use of porous high-density polyethylene (pHDPE) and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) implants is associated with increased risk of infection, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in the Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery.

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Updated Recommendations for Sleep Apnea in Children

MONDAY, Aug. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is revising its recommendations for the diagnosis and management of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) in children and adolescents, according to a clinical practice guideline published online Aug. 27 in Pediatrics.

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New Model Explains How Lungs Clear Foreign Matter

FRIDAY, Aug. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Mucus in the lungs clears foreign matter by moving along a brush-like periciliary layer rather than a watery layer, which keeps it from sticking to the airway surface, according to a study published in the Aug. 24 issue of Science.

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Neti Pots Linked to Deaths From Amebic Infection

THURSDAY, Aug. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Two patients who died of an amebic infection had no history of freshwater exposure but had ameba in their household plumbing and used a nasal irrigation device for sinus problems, according to a study published online Aug. 22 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Model Accurately Predicts Risk of Oral Cancer Progression

TUESDAY, Aug. 21 (HealthDay News) -- A model that incorporates loss of heterozygosity data can accurately predict which patients with low-grade oral cancer are likely to progress to higher grades, according to a study published online Aug. 21 in Cancer Prevention Research.

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Considerable Variation in Outcomes for Cleft Lip/Palate

FRIDAY, Aug. 17 (HealthDay News) -- There is considerable variation in the neuropsychological, behavioral, and academic outcomes of individuals with cleft lip and palate, as the outcomes are affected by developmental level, sex, and cleft type, according to a study published in the July issue of The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal.

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FDA: Codeine May Be Fatal in Subset of Children

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Some children may be at risk for serious adverse events, including death, after taking codeine for relief of pain following tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy for obstructive sleep apnea, according to a safety communication issued Aug. 15 by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration.

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Poor Follow-Up of Hospital Tests Often Due to Late Orders

TUESDAY, Aug. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Poor follow-up of test results at or after discharge from the hospital is often due to tests requested on the day of discharge, according to a letter to the editor published online Aug. 13 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Prognostic Factors Identified in Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma

FRIDAY, Aug. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Diagnosis of low- or intermediate-grade tumors is associated with significantly better overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC) of the salivary glands, while advanced disease stage and perineural invasion are the most significant indicators of poor prognosis, according to a study published in the Aug. 15 issue of Cancer.

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Oral Corticosteroids Deemed Ineffective for Rhinosinusitis

TUESDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Systemic corticosteroids are not effective for symptom control in patients with acute rhinosinusitis, according to a study published online Aug. 7 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

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Photosensitizing Antihypertensive Meds Up Risk of Lip Cancer

TUESDAY, Aug. 7 (HealthDay News) -- For non-Hispanic whites, long-term treatment with photosensitizing antihypertensive agents correlates with an increased likelihood of lip cancer, according to a study published online Aug. 6 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Diode Laser Efficient, Safe for Tonsillotomy in Children

MONDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- A fiber-guided 1,470 nm diode laser system is safe and effective for tonsillotomy in the treatment of obstructive tonsillar hypertrophy in children, according to a study published online July 26 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Honey Reduces Cough in Child Upper Respiratory Infection

MONDAY, Aug. 6 (HealthDay News) -- For young children with nocturnal cough and sleep difficulty due to upper respiratory tract infection (URI), treatment with honey is associated with greater symptomatic relief than a silan date placebo, according to a study published online Aug. 6 in Pediatrics.

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Clinicians Can Unintentionally Prompt Nocebo Effect

THURSDAY, Aug. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The nocebo effect, or induction of a symptom perceived as negative by sham treatment and/or the suggestion of negative expectation, may arise from suggestions by doctors and nurses, according to a study published in Deutsches Ärzteblatt International.

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