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Vitamin D Repletion Offers No Short-Term Benefit in Lipids

Last Updated: September 04, 2012.

 

LDL cholesterol correlates with vitamin D-induced changes in serum calcium, parathyroid hormone

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For vitamin D deficient adults, repletion of vitamin D is not associated with short-term improvement in the lipid profile, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

TUESDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- For vitamin D deficient adults, repletion of vitamin D is not associated with short-term improvement in the lipid profile, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

Manish P. Ponda, M.D., from the Rockefeller University in New York City, and colleagues examined the short-term effect of vitamin D repletion on the lipid profile in a study involving 151 vitamin D deficient adults with elevated risk for cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomly allocated to 50,000 international units of vitamin D weekly for eight weeks, or a placebo.

The researchers observed no change in the number of small low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles with vitamin D repletion compared with placebo. In addition, no changes were noted with vitamin D repletion in the chemical lipid profile, including total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or triglycerides. Changes in LDL cholesterol in the vitamin D repletion group correlated positively with changes in serum calcium and inversely with changes in serum parathyroid hormone, based on exploratory multivariate analysis.

"In contrast to the association between low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and dyslipidemia, correcting vitamin D deficiency in the short-term does not improve the lipid profile," the authors write. "Repletion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels raised serum calcium levels and decreased serum parathyroid hormone levels. These expected physiological responses to vitamin D therapy were correlated with a significant increase in LDL cholesterol."

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Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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