Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Gynecology | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Maternal Smoking Link to Teen Obesity Mediated by Fat Intake

Last Updated: September 06, 2012.

 

Teens exposed to prenatal smoking have increased fat intake; lower amygdala volume

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
The increased risk of obesity seen in adolescents who experienced prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoking is associated with enhanced dietary intake of fat, which may be partially mediated by changes in the amygdala, according to research published online Sept. 3 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

THURSDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The increased risk of obesity seen in adolescents who experienced prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoking (PEMCS) is associated with enhanced dietary intake of fat, which may be partially mediated by changes in the amygdala, according to research published online Sept. 3 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Amirreza Haghighi, M.D., of The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional study using a population-based cohort of 378 adolescents, aged 13 to 19 years, to examine whether PEMCS increases the risk of obesity by enhancing fat intake. To assess whether this association was related to structural variation in brain regions involved in reward processing, changes in the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, and orbitofrontal cortex were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging.

The researchers found that exposed adolescents had significantly more total body fat (about 1.7 kg) and a significantly increased fat intake (2.7 percent) compared with those who had not experienced PEMCS. Exposed teenagers also had an average of 95 mm³ lower amygdala volume, which correlated inversely with fat intake. No other differences in other brain structures were observed.

"In summary, the results of our study are consistent with the fetal-programming hypothesis of obesity and suggest that PEMCS may contribute in this context by modifying fat intake through neural mechanisms involving the amygdala," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Nearly Half of Teens With Autism Are Victims of Bullying Next: Ginkgo Biloba Extract Does Not Cut Progression to Alzheimer's

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.