Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Nursing | ENT | Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Pulmonology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Teens More Likely to Smoke if They Think Their Friends Smoke

Last Updated: September 07, 2012.

 

Friend self-reported smoking has less impact; smoking significantly linked to popularity

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Peer influence and social context impact adolescent smoking behaviors, with popular teenagers and adolescents who think their friends smoke more likely to become smokers, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Peer influence and social context impact adolescent smoking behaviors, with popular teenagers and adolescents who think their friends smoke more likely to become smokers, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

Thomas W. Valente, Ph.D., from the University of Southern California in Alhambra, and colleagues analyzed longitudinal data collected in the ninth and tenth grades (October 2006 and 2007) from 1,950 predominantly Hispanic/Latino adolescents in seven Southern California schools.

The researchers found that there was a significant and consistent association between an egocentric measure of perceived friend smoking and individual smoking (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], ~1.80). The sociometric counterpart of friend self-report smoking correlated with smoking only in the ninth-grade cross-sectional models (aOR, 1.56), and the association was rarely seen in longitudinal models. Smoking and becoming a smoker were significantly associated with popularity, measured by the proportion of nominations received by class size (aOR, 1.67), whereas in longitudinal models, perceived norms were not associated. Becoming a smoker was also associated with friend selection (aOR, 1.32; P = 0.05).

"This study illustrates the utility of egocentric data for understanding peer influence and underscores the importance of perceptions and popularity as mechanisms that influence adolescent smoking," Valente and colleagues conclude.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Imaging Device Quantifies Change in Port Wine Stains Next: Fetal Well-Being Generally Fine After Strenuous Exercise

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.