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Good Long-Term Prognosis for Benign IgA Nephropathy

Last Updated: September 07, 2012.

The long-term prognosis for Caucasian patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy with benign presentation (consisting of only minor urinary abnormalities and normal renal function) is excellent, without special treatment, according to research published online Sept. 6 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

FRIDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The long-term prognosis for Caucasian patients with immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy with benign presentation (consisting of only minor urinary abnormalities and normal renal function) is excellent, without special treatment, according to research published online Sept. 6 in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Eduardo Gutiérrez, M.D., of the Hospital 12 de Octubre in Madrid, and colleagues conducted a long-term study involving 141 Caucasian patients with biopsy-proven IgA nephropathy with normal kidney function, minor abnormalities at presentation, and who were not taking immunosuppressants or corticosteroids. Participants were followed for a median of 108 months.

After 10, 15, and 20 years, the researchers found that 96.7, 91.9, and 91.9 percent of patients, respectively, maintained serum creatinine levels below a 50 percent increase from baseline. No patient developed end-stage renal disease. After a median of 48 months of follow-up, clinical remission had occurred in 37.5 percent of patients. At the end of follow-up, the median proteinuria was 0.1 g/24 hours and 29.1 percent of patients had no proteinuria. Hypertension increased from 16.3 percent at presentation to 21.3 percent at the end of the study. Overall, 41.8 percent of patients were treated with renin-angiotensin blockers.

"Renal function decline was exceptional, whereas sustained clinical remission was observed in more than one-third of the patients," the authors write. "Increasing proteinuria to >1 g/24 hours and hypertension were observed in a minority of patients."

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