Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Nursing | Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

No Long-Term Effects Seen for Letting Infants Cry Before Sleep

Last Updated: September 10, 2012.

 

Five-year follow-up shows no differences in child-parent relationship, child behavior, parent stress

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Infant sleep training techniques employed to reduce the short- to medium-term burden of infant sleep problems do not have lasting effects, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Pediatrics.

MONDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Infant sleep training techniques employed to reduce the short- to medium-term burden of infant sleep problems do not have lasting effects, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Pediatrics.

Anna M.H. Price, Ph.D., from the Royal Children's Hospital in Parkville, Australia, and colleagues conducted a five-year follow-up of a population-based cluster-randomized trial involving 326 children with parent-reported sleep problems at age 7 months. Children were allocated to intervention (173 children) or usual care; intervention consisted of behavioral techniques delivered over one to three individual nurse consultations at age 8 to 10 months.

A total of 69 percent of families participated. The researchers found no significant differences between intervention and control families for any outcome in children's emotional and conduct behavior scores, including sleep problems (9 versus 7 percent; P = 0.2), sleep habits score, parent- and child-reported psychosocial functioning, or chronic stress (29 versus 22 percent; P = 0.4 for chronic stress). There were also no significant differences in child-parent closeness and conflict, including global relationship and disinhibited attachment. There was no difference seen in parent anxiety, depression, and stress scores or authoritative parenting (63 versus 59 percent; P = 0.5 for authoritative parenting).

"The six-year-old findings indicate that there were no marked long-term (at least to five years' post-intervention) harms or benefits," the authors write. "We therefore conclude that parents can feel confident using, and health professionals can feel confident offering, behavioral techniques such as controlled comforting and camping out for managing infant sleep."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Mother's Depression During Infancy Affects Child's Growth Next: AAP Updates Flu Vaccine Recommendations for Children

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.