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AAP Updates Flu Vaccine Recommendations for Children

Last Updated: September 10, 2012.

 

American Academy of Pediatrics recommends trivalent flu vaccine for youth over 6 months of age

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The American Academy of Pediatrics has updated recommendations for routine use of trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine and antiviral medications for the prevention and treatment of influenza in children, according to a policy statement published online Sept. 10 in Pediatrics.

MONDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has updated recommendations for routine use of trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine and antiviral medications for the prevention and treatment of influenza in children, according to a policy statement published online Sept. 10 in Pediatrics.

Michael T. Brady, M.D., and colleagues from the AAP's Committee on Infectious Diseases, updated recommendations for routine use of trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine and antiviral medications for the prevention and management of influenza in children for the 2012 to 2013 season.

The committee made three main points regarding vaccination for the upcoming season. Firstly, the 2012 to 2013 trivalent influenza vaccine contains A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)-like antigen (derived from influenza A [H1N1] pdm09 [pH1N1] virus); A/Victoria/ 361/2011 (H3N2)-like antigen; and B/Wisconsin/1/2010-like antigen. The influenza A (H3N2) and B antigens are different from those in the 2010 to 2011 and 2011 to 2012 seasonal vaccines. Secondly, all individuals, including children and adolescents aged ≥6 months during the 2012 to 2013 season, should be vaccinated. Third, for children aged 6 months through 8 years of age an updated dosing algorithm for administration of influenza vaccine has been created.

"Pediatricians, nurses, and all health care personnel should promote influenza vaccine use and infection control measures," the authors write. "In addition, pediatricians should promptly identify influenza infections to enable rapid treatment, when indicated, to reduce morbidity and mortality."

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