Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Nursing | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Obese Teens Self-Report Eating Less Than Healthy-Weight Peers

Last Updated: September 10, 2012.

 

Young children report higher intake of energy than healthy-weight peers; may lead to onset of obesity

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Younger obese children report consuming more daily calories than their healthy-weight peers, while obese adolescents report consuming fewer daily calories, suggesting that excessive energy intake in early childhood may lead to onset of obesity, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Pediatrics.

MONDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Younger obese children report consuming more daily calories than their healthy-weight peers, while obese adolescents report consuming fewer daily calories, suggesting that excessive energy intake in early childhood may lead to onset of obesity, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Pediatrics.

In an effort to assess the relationship between reported daily energy intake and categorized weight status across childhood, Asheley Cockrell Skinner, Ph.D., of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues used a nationally representative cross-sectional sample of 12,648 children aged 1 to 17 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2001 to 2008.

The researchers found that weight status and age correlated positively with self-reported energy intake. However, there was a negative effect throughout childhood for the interaction between weight and age. Compared with their healthy-weight peers, young obese/overweight children reported consuming significantly more calories, while obese/overweight adolescents reported consuming fewer calories.

"Our findings are that, on average, across a nationally representative sample, younger overweight children have greater self-reported energy intake than their healthy-weight peers, yet overweight adolescents have lower self-reported energy intake," the authors write. "This suggests that reducing childhood obesity may require early education on appropriate levels of energy intake and, in later childhood, a focus on non-calorie-reducing interventions such as increases in activity."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: NSAID Use Ups Cardiovascular Risk Up to Five Years Post-MI Next: Heavy Drinking Linked to Intracerebral Bleed at Young Age

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.