Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Internal Medicine | Critical Care | Emergency Medicine | Pharmacy | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Tranexamic Acid Safe for Wide Spectrum of Trauma Patients

Last Updated: September 12, 2012.

 

Treatment within three hours of injury could potentially avert 17 to 36 percent of deaths

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Tranexamic acid reduces risk of death and thrombotic events in patients with traumatic bleeding, irrespective of the baseline risk of death, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in BMJ.

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Tranexamic acid reduces risk of death and thrombotic events in patients with traumatic bleeding, irrespective of the baseline risk of death, according to a study published online Sept. 11 in BMJ.

To estimate the proportion of deaths that could potentially have been averted through administration of tranexamic acid, Ian Roberts, M.D., from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and colleagues used data from an international trial involving 13,273 trauma patients who were assigned to tranexamic acid or placebo. Patients were stratified by the baseline risk of death (<6 percent; 6 to 20 percent; 21 to 50 percent; and >50 percent).

The researchers found that tranexamic acid correlated with a significant reduction in all-cause mortality and in death from bleeding. There were fewer deaths among tranexamic acid-treated patients for each stratum of baseline risk of death, with no evidence of heterogeneity in the effect of tranexamic acid on all-cause mortality or deaths from bleeding based on baseline risk of death. Tranexamic acid-treated patients had a significant decrease in the odds of fatal and nonfatal thrombotic events and arterial thrombotic events but no significant reduction in venous thrombotic events. The percentage of deaths that could have been averted with tranexamic acid administration within three hours of injury ranged from 17 to 36 percent for the different baseline risk strata.

"Tranexamic acid can be administered safely to a wide spectrum of patients with traumatic bleeding and should not be restricted to the most severely injured," the authors write.

The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine disclosed funding from Pfizer, which manufactures tranexamic acid.

Full Text

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Considerable Variation Seen for Medicare Cost-Saving Program Next: Rare Cancer Syndrome Linked to Lower Diabetes Risk

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.