Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Internal Medicine | Nephrology | Nursing | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

‘Choosing Wisely’ Suggestions Should Improve Kidney Care

Last Updated: September 14, 2012.

 

Five recommendations from American Society of Nephrology may cut spending, prevent harm

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
The American Society of Nephrology Quality and Patient Safety Task Force has developed a set of five recommendations to improve care for patients with kidney disease, according to an article published online Sept. 13 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

FRIDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) Quality and Patient Safety (QPS) Task Force has developed a set of five recommendations to improve care for patients with kidney disease, according to an article published online Sept. 13 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

Amy W. Williams, M.D., from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues on behalf of the ASN QPS Task Force initiated the "Choosing Wisely" campaign to identify areas in patient care and resource use that could be improved. Each of nine subspecialty organizations identified five tests, procedures, or therapies that they believe to be overused, misused, or could potentially lead to harm or unnecessary health care spending.

The Task Force selected the following five recommendations based on their relevance and importance to patients with kidney disease. Routine cancer screening should not be performed for dialysis patients with limited life expectancies who are without signs or symptoms. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents should not be administered to patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) with hemoglobin levels ≥10 g/dL who do not have symptoms of anemia. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be avoided for individuals with hypertension, heart failure, or CKD of all causes, including diabetes. Peripherally-inserted central catheters should not be placed in stage 3 to 5 CKD patients without a nephrology consult. Finally, chronic dialysis should not be initiated without a shared decision-making process involving patients, their family, and their physicians.

"The five recommendations developed by the ASN QPS Task Force for the 'Choosing Wisely' campaign should help prompt and encourage conversations between patients and care teams and lead to a mutual understanding of the risks, benefits, and impact on the patient's overall outcome," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Aubagio Approved for Multiple Sclerosis Next: Antipsychotic Use Up Among U.S. Medicaid-Enrolled Youth

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.