Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Neurology | Pathology | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Urge to Overeat Linked to Production of Natural Narcotic

Last Updated: September 21, 2012.

 

Production of enkephalin stimulates a reward center in the brain

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
When presented with tasty foods, the brain produces the opioid peptide enkephalin that stimulates an unexpected reward center in the brain and leads to overeating, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in Current Biology.

FRIDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- When presented with tasty foods, the brain produces the opioid peptide enkephalin that stimulates an unexpected reward center in the brain and leads to overeating, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in Current Biology.

Noting that mu-opioid receptors are abundant in the dorsal neostriatum, which has been implicated in reward-related functions as well as movement, Alexandra G. DiFeliceantonio, from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues measured extracellular levels of endogenous striatal opioid peptides by placing probes in the anteromedial dorsal neostriatum of rats before and after they were presented with large quantities of M&M chocolate candies.

The researchers found that levels of enkephalin surged by >150 percent as the rats ate the chocolates. Injecting a mu receptor agonist directly into the same area of the brain increased the intake of sweet foods by >250 percent, without affecting the rats liking for sweetness. The rats ate the equivalent of a 68 kg human consuming about 3.6 kg of M&Ms in an hour. Fos plume mapping confirmed that the effect was mediated through the anteromedial quadrant of the dorsal neostriatum and not diffusion of mu receptor agonists to other areas.

"In conclusion, our results provide novel evidence that enkephalin surges and mu-opioid stimulation in the same anteromedial dorsal neostriatum region contribute to signaling the opportunity to eat a sensory reward and to causally generating increased consumption of that reward," DiFeliceantonio and colleagues write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Perceived Stress Linked to Asthma, Atopic Disorders Next: Increased Prevalence of Obesity in Rural Areas

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.