Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Nursing | Pediatrics | Pharmacy | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Limited Evidence on Medication Use for Youth With Autism

Last Updated: September 24, 2012.

 

Review IDs lack of evidence on medication use for 13- to 30-year-olds with autism spectrum disorder

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
There is a lack of evidence supporting the use of medications in adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders, according to a review published online Sept. 24 in Pediatrics.

MONDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- There is a lack of evidence supporting the use of medications in adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), according to a review published online Sept. 24 in Pediatrics.

Dwayne Dove, M.D., Ph.D., from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues conducted a systematic review to examine medication treatments for individuals between the ages of 13 and 30 with ASD.

Eight studies were identified, of which four were of fair quality. The researchers found that the strength of evidence was insufficient for all outcomes associated with medications examined within the study population. The most consistent findings were seen in two available studies of risperidone, which supported moderate evidence for treating problem behavior, including aggression, in children with ASD, and strong evidence for adverse events, including sedation and weight gain.

"Given the number of individuals affected by ASD, there is a dramatic lack of evidence on best approaches to therapies for adolescents and young adults with these conditions," the authors write. "Little evidence supports the use of medication treatments in the adolescent and young adult population."

One author disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Tied to Increased BMI, Obesity Next: AAP Strongly Discourages Home Trampolines

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.