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Best Mouse Model of Tumor Drug Exposure Identified

Last Updated: September 25, 2012.

 

Genetically-engineered mice have similar tumor pharmacokinetics to human tumor for carboplatin

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Compared with mouse or human melanomas transplanted into mice, a genetically-engineered mouse melanoma model best approximates the tumor pharmacokinetics of a melanoma drug observed in patients, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in The Oncologist.

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with mouse or human melanomas transplanted into mice, a genetically-engineered mouse melanoma model best approximates the tumor pharmacokinetics of a melanoma drug observed in patients, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in The Oncologist.

Austin J. Combest, Pharm.D., from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues compared the plasma and tumor dispositions of carboplatin in patients with cutaneous melanoma and in four mouse melanoma models: one genetically engineered, one xenograft (human melanoma transplanted into immunodeficient mice), and two orthotopic syngeneic transplants (mouse melanoma transplanted into immunocompetent mice).

The researchers found that orthotopic syngeneic transplants and xenografts were poor predictors of drug exposure in human tumors. Only the genetically-engineered mouse model had similar pharmacokinetic parameters to those seen in human tumors.

"The tumor pharmacokinetics of carboplatin in a genetically-engineered mouse model of melanoma more closely resembles the tumor disposition in patients with melanoma than transplanted tumor models," Combest and colleagues conclude. "Genetically-engineered mouse models show promise in becoming an improved prediction model for intratumoral pharmacokinetics and response in patients with solid tumors."

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