Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Endocrinology | Gynecology | Pathology | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

BPA Alters Oogenesis and Follicle Formation in Primates

Last Updated: September 25, 2012.

 

Bisphenol A exposure associated with two unique phenotypes in continuously exposed rhesus monkeys

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Rhesus monkeys exposed to bisphenol A experience alterations in early oogenesis and follicle formation, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Rhesus monkeys exposed to bisphenol A (BPA) experience alterations in early oogenesis and follicle formation, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Noting that low-dose exposure to BPA adversely affects oogenesis in rodents, Patricia A. Hunt, Ph.D., from Washington State University in Pullman, and colleagues investigated whether BPA induces similar disturbances in the developing primate ovary. Two different exposure protocols were implemented: single oral doses and continuous exposure via subdermal implant.

The researchers found that, in second trimester fetuses, BPA exposure at the time of meiotic onset induced subtle disturbances in prophase events. Third trimester fetuses exposed to single oral doses during the time of follicle formation exhibited an increase in multioocyte follicles. These findings were similar to those reported in rodents. Persistent unenclosed oocytes in the medullary region and small, non-growing oocytes in secondary and antral follicles were new phenotypes evident in continuously exposed animals.

"Because effects on both stages of oogenesis were elicited using doses that yield circulating levels of BPA analogous to those reported in humans, these findings raise concerns for human reproductive health," Hunt and colleagues conclude.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Marijuana-Like Chemical Corrects Behavior in Fragile X Next: Risk of Post-Cesarean Infection Up for Overweight, Obese

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.