Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Infections | Internal Medicine | Oncology | Pathology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Conditional Reprogramming Can Help ID Pathogenic Viruses

Last Updated: September 26, 2012.

 

Mutant HPV-11 identified in pulmonary tumor cells from patient with respiratory papillomatosis

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Conditional reprogramming can be successfully used to generate cell cultures from normal and tumor tissue of a patient with papillomatosis, facilitating identification of a mutant human papillomavirus and allowing appropriate treatment, according to a study published in the Sept. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Conditional reprogramming can be successfully used to generate cell cultures from normal and tumor tissue of a patient with papillomatosis, facilitating identification of a mutant human papillomavirus (HPV) and allowing appropriate treatment, according to a study published in the Sept. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Hang Yuan, Ph.D., from the Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C., and colleagues describe a case of a 24-year-old male patient with a 20-year history of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis with progressive, bilateral tumor invasion of the lung parenchyma. Conditional reprogramming was used to generate cell cultures from normal and tumorous tissue taken from the patient's lung.

The researchers found that there were distinct HPV-11 genomes in the laryngeal tumor cells and pulmonary tumor cells, with a wild-type 7.9-kb and 10.4-kb HPV-11 genome, respectively. Duplication of the promoter and oncogene regions accounted for the increase in size of the viral genome from the pulmonary tumor. Based on chemosensitivity testing, vorinostat was identified as a potential therapeutic agent. Tumor sizes had stabilized at three months after treatment initiation, with durable effects seen at 15 months.

"In this study, we used the method [conditional reprogramming] to establish long-term cultures of tumor cells from a patient with recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. The cultures helped us to identify a mutant HPV-11 in the lung tumors and to screen a limited number of drugs for potential clinical application," the authors write. "This represents an example of personalized medicine."

Two authors disclosed involvement with a patent regarding the cell culture technology used in the study.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Gut Bacteria Offers Clues About Risk of Developing T2DM Next: Being Deemed 'Unfit to Drive' Cuts Subsequent Road Crashes

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.